Best wishes for/in the new year

tomtombp

Senior Member
Hungarian
Best wishes for/in the new year

Is it in or for? For makes more sense to me as it's a wish for that period not a wish made in the new year. On the other hand, for is used for what we wish for.

I've seen both.

Also would you capitalize Best, Wishes, New and Year?
 
Last edited:
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    On the other hand, for is used for what we wish for.
    I don't understand why you say "on the other hand". You have correctly stated why we use "for". You want the wishes to happen: that is what you are wishing for.

    By the way, you could make a New Year's resolution to include your subject text in your question so that the moderators have less work to do.

    You could edit your post now.
     

    tomtombp

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Thanks, I think "in" comes from "All the best in the new year".

    I don't understand why you say "on the other hand". You have correctly stated why we use "for". You want the wishes to happen: that is what you are wishing for.
    I meant "for" is reserved for the wish itself not the period.

    By the way, you could make a New Year's resolution to include your subject text in your question so that the moderators have less work to do.

    You could edit your post now.
    Edited. Sorry about that.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The wishes are being made now. They are for the New Year to be a good and happy one. "Best wishes" is a set phrase which means something along the lines of "I wish everything will be the best for you". If we are linking the wishes to an event, then "on" is normal. If we are linking the wishes to a period then it is "for".

    Best wishes on your birthday. Best wishes on your wedding day. Best wishes for your new job. Best wishes for the new year.(I don't capitalize that, some do.)
     

    siares

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    If we are linking the wishes to an event, then "on" is normal. If we are linking the wishes to a period then it is "for".
    What do you think of 'in' in I wish you the best in New Year?
    I would prefer 'in' because I mean I want for the good to meet you in the course of a year.

    Other threads: most prefer 'for' but say that 'in' is possible.
    "all the best in the new year" or "all the best for the New Year"
    I would instinctively use "for" myself, but I don't think there's any difference in meaning, no.
    I could not say "All the best in the next year" or "All the best to the next year".
    I would use in if it was one specific exam and with if I wasn´t sure how many different tests the exam consisted of.

     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    What do you think of 'in' in I wish you the best in New Year?
    I would prefer 'in' because I mean I want for the good to meet you in the course of a year.

    Other threads: most prefer 'for' but say that 'in' is possible.
    Most people in those threads that you you found seem to agree that "for" is the usual way of doing it: if you express the wish to the person now "for the New Year" then you're automatically projecting it forward to the duration of the coming year. As I said in my post, I don't think that using "in" alters the meaning.
     

    siares

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    then you're automatically projecting it forward to the duration of the coming year.
    Thank you. Is wishing 'good' grammatically different to wishing love, health, luck/success? I prefer the for-less version in the quote below, and that makes me want to use 'in' with NY.
    Both are correct.
    "Good luck tomorrow" = "I wish that/hope you will have good luck tomorrow"
    "Good luck for tomorrow" = "In respect of the thing that will happen tomorrow, I wish/hope you have good luck at that time."
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Thank you. Is wishing 'good' grammatically different to wishing love, health, luck/success? I prefer the for-less version in the quote below, and that makes me want to use 'in' with NY.
    It's the context (in the example you've given there it's a driving test) which makes that work without the "for". If someone had a series of exams next week, I could say "Good luck next week!"

    I suppose you could say "Good luck next year" but unless it was linked to a particular event other than just a new year, then it would sound rather odd in my opinion.
     

    siares

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    "Good luck next year" but unless it was linked to a particular event other than just a new year
    Thank you, DonnyB. One last question - I didn't realise 'luck' must be linked to a specific situation, in my language there is only one word for luck/happiness - could you confirm for words which are not, below?
    I wish you riches, good health and happiness in the new year.:confused:
    I wish you riches, good health and happiness for the new year.:tick:
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I don't think I've ever heard anybody say that, but I think "in" works better there.

    Something like "good health", particularly, is something you'd experience in or during the coming year. :)
     
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