Best wishes -FOR or TO- your shows

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Lilax

Member
Spanish Argentina
Hi again XD!


I'm very confuse, because, I was looking for answer about the use of TO and FOR and I found

"Best wishes for your show"

and

"Best wishes TO your shows"

I read a lot of forums and I don't know what is right...

Thanks!
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Can you explain in different words what it is you are trying to say, Lilax? Are you trying to tell someone -- an artist, perhaps -- that you hope they have a good show (or good shows)?
     

    Lilax

    Member
    Spanish Argentina
    No, I was looking about the use of TO and FOR and in a blog I found "Best wishes to your shows" and in some pages about anoher things, blogs, news, I found "Best wishes to your show" (concerts, and other things)

    And now I'm confusedl:confused:
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    If the person is saying "I hope you have a good show," meaning a concert or performance, then "Best wishes for your show" is how we would say it.

    "Best wishes to your show/s" sounds odd to me, and I can't think of a situation when I would use it.
     

    Lilax

    Member
    Spanish Argentina
    Yes, sorry!!!!!! My mistake!

    In a blog I found

    "TO your shows"



    and in news, and some pages...


    and other places I found

    "FOR your concert" show...
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    If you can provide a link to someplace where you found "Best wishes to your shows," then we can take a look at it and perhaps let you know whether it appears to have been written by a native English speaker.

    I will stand by my assessment that "Best wishes to your show/s" does not sound natural.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Grammar aside, in some countries you probably wouldn't want to say that to anyone involved in theatre. I don't know whether the tradition exists in other countries, but at least in the UK (and in France) it's considered bad luck to say 'good luck' or 'best wishes' before a performance. The usual expression is "Break a leg" – and the other person shouldn't reply.

    That said, it doesn't apply to all forms of entertainment; so if you were to say it, it would be "... for your show", not "... to your show".

    I'm also curious, like Florentia, to know where you saw "to your shows".

    Ws:)
     

    Buman_heing

    Member
    russian
    Here's my two cents on this.
    Since wishing is for someone who's gonna perform the action(s), we address it to that person. We wish something to someone for some purpose (in this case, to be successful). There is no need to wish anything to a non-living entity... well, of course you still can but it doesn't care anyway.
    I wish you good luck. (This wish is addressed to you) ...or we could say it as Yoda would:
    Good luck I wish to you.
    :)
    And the last but not least, I think the most full/formal version would be:
    I wish it to you, all the best, for your show to be successful.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Your reasoning is good, B_h (and I'm sure Yoda would with you agree :p).

    However your final version isn't a normal English construction. It could be "I wish you all the best for your show" or "I wish you success for your show".
    The only idiomatic way I can see to combine the two would be something like "I wish you all the best for your show, and I hope it will be successful".

    Ws:)
     

    Lilax

    Member
    Spanish Argentina
    Hi, sorry I couldn't answer it before...

    First, I was looking for two pages, one of them said "Best wishes to your birthday" and another page said "to your shows" but I can't find de last one, because it was a PDF, and I found it looking for differents things, "the birthday's page" was a page with differents forms of saying something about wishes and all that.

    (I'm looking it right now! I don't save my history's pages)

    To and For, drive me crazy -.-!


    Second, I don't belive in LUCK, I just belive in God, people who belive in God don't belive in superstitions :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I asked Google, which looked around the internet and could find exactly one instance aside from this thread. It's a Tweet from an anonymous person styling himself or herself "Jinxx", and it does indeed say "Best wishes to your show". That's it. Not exactly a source of grammar guidance.
     
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