Bet or bid

Is there any difference between 'bet' and 'body and can we bid or bet something other than money, like candies?
There is a boy , who never completes his homework on time , so the children bet or bid.
I bet a/ bid for a chocolate, that he will not complete his homework even today.
Or
I bid a / for achocolate, that he will not complete his homework even today.
What should be used?
Thank you
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    There is a small amount of overlap between "bet" and "bid", but to use "bid" you really need a type of auction (someone else might bid two chocolates, for example). Here it seems a straightforward bet. There is nothing wrong with using "bet" for things other than money.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Is there any difference between 'bet' and 'body
    :confused: What does that mean?

    To bid is nothing like to bet.

    I bid for a chocolate, that he will not complete his homework even today. :cross: This is not idiomatic, and it is not good English and it makes no sense.
    I bet a for a chocolate, that he will not complete his homework even today. :thumbsup:

    If you bid for something, you offer money (or very rarely, something of value) and if your bid wins, then you exchange the money for the item. If you do not win, you keep the money.

    If you bet on something, you gamble; you put something you own (often, but not always, money) at risk if what you have predicted does not come true. If what you have predicted does come true, you win the bet, you keep your money, and receive more money - if you lose, you loose your money.
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think 'bet' is correct here since 'bid' is usually for buying items at an auction. The person who bids the most money gets the item. Did you write 'body' instead of 'boy'?:rolleyes:
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I think that if you do not use an indirect object, then the implications are
    (i) you will actually bet [with] anyone or
    (ii) it is an idiom in which, e.g. "I bet a dollar ..." means "I am pretty certain that ...," but no actual bet is intended. Here, the sum is increase in line with the certainty.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I might say "I'm willing to bet a dollar" or "I'll bet anyone a dollar" but not "I bet a dollar." For (ii), I would just say "I bet."

    Who knows, maybe it's just my idiolect. ;)
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    So what should be used?


    So what should I use :
    Bet a or
    Bet you a or I'm willing to bet a_______
    Who are you speaking to and who is the bet with. In the original post it seemed the bet was with the child, but the conversation was with someone else, in which case you might say "I bet him a chocolate".

    In BrE, while it is more common to include "you" in the sentence when arranging a bet with someone, you don't need to include it twice. Since the bet is "I bet a chocolate you won't finish your homework", there is no need to say "I bet you a chocolate you..."
    Even when the person you are arranging the bet with isn't the person being bet on, it is not essential in BrE to add "you":
    Father: I bet £5 John won't finish his homework
    Mother: You're on!
    (shouts upstairs): John! You get on with your homework right now, you hear me?​
     
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