betray’d Lends hideous night

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Michael30000

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

From the book Thank You for Being Late by Thomas Friedman.

Mr. Friedman cites fragments of texts and invites the reader to determine if the text was written by a human or a computer.

2. “When I in dreams behold thy fairest shade
Whose shade in dreams doth wake the sleeping morn
The daytime shadow of my love betray’d
Lends hideous night
to dreaming’s faded form.”

The phrase "betray’d Lends hideous night" sounds strange to me, particularly the "betray’d Lends" part?
Is "lend" as a verb used in its usual meaning?

Thank you.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You can gloss “lends” as “gives” there.
    Assuming this makes any sense at all I’d say the gist of it is: the horrible experience haunts my waking.
    Or it might mean something else. Or it might mean nothing!

    For sure it’s a human tendency to try and squeeze meaning out of any sentence, however odd it seems. Have you googled this to see if it has life outside this book?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    So: not authentic poetry and thus incoherent despite our best efforts to squeeze meaning from it.

    Your translation needs to have the same « pseudo-old but not quite right » feel to it. :D
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Read The Sonnet Co-Authored By Shakespeare, An MIT PhD Student & A Machine-Learning Algorithm
    Read The Sonnet Co-Authored By Shakespeare, An MIT PhD Student & A Machine-Learning Algorithm

    This is my favourite part of this beautiful nonsense:
    For nature’s smile is ornament enough
    When thy gold lips unloose their drooping bands*
    As clouds occlude the globe’s enshrouded fears
    Which can by no astron’my be assail’d

    *It sounds like a bloodhound wearing gold lipstick! :D

     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ...
    The daytime shadow of my love betray’d
    Lends hideous night
    to dreaming’s faded form.”

    The phrase "betray’d Lends hideous night" sounds strange to me, particularly the "betray’d Lends"...
    "betray’d Lends hideous night" is not one phrase - it is part of two different clauses. I suspect you may be parsing it incorrectly.

    "The daytime shadow of my love betray’d, lends hideous night to dreaming’s faded form.”

    Simplified, this becomes:

    "The daytime shadow lends night to dreaming's form."

    or

    "The daytime shadow of X lends hideous night to Y"
     
    Last edited:

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    This describes what the sonnet is meant to be about:
    The result? Multiple new works (co-)created in the style of various authors — including the following ‘Shakespearean’ sonnet (which depicts a scorned lover struggling with the disconnect between his ongoing love for the outward appearance of the object of his desire, with the knowledge of rejection/betrayal that belies this surface beauty)
    Read The Sonnet Co-Authored By Shakespeare, An MIT PhD Student & A Machine-Learning Algorithm
     

    Michael30000

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "betray’d Lends hideous night" is not one phrase - it is part of two different clauses. I suspect you may be parsing it incorrectly.

    "The daytime shadow of my love betray’d, lends hideous night to dreaming’s faded form.”

    Simplified, this becomes:

    "The daytime shadow lends night to dreaming's form."

    or

    "The daytime shadow of X lends hideous night to Y"
    Thank you, chasint.
     

    Michael30000

    Senior Member
    Russian
    This describes what the sonnet is meant to be about:
    The result? Multiple new works (co-)created in the style of various authors — including the following ‘Shakespearean’ sonnet (which depicts a scorned lover struggling with the disconnect between his ongoing love for the outward appearance of the object of his desire, with the knowledge of rejection/betrayal that belies this surface beauty)
    Read The Sonnet Co-Authored By Shakespeare, An MIT PhD Student & A Machine-Learning Algorithm
    Thank you, Trochfa.
     
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