Better off and worse off

sorry2spam

Member
Hindi, English(UK)
I know about the word 'better off' being correct but I have also heard 'worse off' from some people and they use it just as the opposite of 'better off'. Do you guys think this usage is correct or even if worse off is used in such contexts?

Thanks in advance. :)
 
  • AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    Sure. Joe was having a tough time paying his bills. Now he has been laid off his job. He is worse off than before.

    John was trying to date a girl who is not very serious about anything, but he never connected with her. He is better off without her.
     

    sorry2spam

    Member
    Hindi, English(UK)
    Ok, great. :) Thanks for the quick replies guys. Now I am quite sure that being in Word Reference Forums I will be able to improve my English quite fast. :D
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    The expression better off may be used absolutely, "The roads are monopolised by better off", i.e. by the rich. Worse off can only be used as in the example by AlabamaBoy.
     
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