better off

Phi

Senior Member
USA
Arabic
"it might make it a bit murky to throw in things and analyze them, I think we are better off without it."

I have dificulty getting the meaning of the meaning of the bold part please.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    I agree with ColinForhan. "Better off" is a common phrase to mean "in a better position".

    "Considering all the money I've lost running this store, I would have been better off never opening it."

    "I appreciate the job offer, but I'm better off staying in my current job. At least they give me medical benefits."

    "If you want the longest life expectancy, statistically speaking you're better off being married than single."
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    Better off is an idiomatic expression that makes no sense by just analyzing the words separately. It is like go off, such as when a bomb goes off or an alarm goes off. It was difficult for my wife to uinderstand these idioms and why we say these things the way we do when she was first learning English.
    Simply, Better off means to be in a better or more prosperous condition or position: IE, "We would be better off taking the train instead of driving"; "I felt better off after the rise in stock prices". "In the old days we were better off without interfering in world politics". "Income-wise we were better off when I worked for my previous employer".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I can think of a few more formal ways to say it:

    "It is/would be to my/his/their advantage..."
    "It would be more advantageous..."
    "I/He/They would be better served..."
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It's just my understanding of the register of the phrases. I can't imagine someone in a heated argument in casual conversation saying:

    "God damn it, Louise! You've been a pain in my ass from day one. It would have been to my advantage never to have moved in with you!" rather than "I would've been better off never moving in with you!"

    That looks to me like a mix of informal and formal registers. I may be wrong

    Conversely, this sounds like a mix of formal and informal registers to me:

    "Company ABC, having performed its due diligence, has weighed all factors regarding the merger with company XYZ and has decided it would be better off rejecting the offer."

    Unmixed:

    "Company ABC, having performed its due diligence, has weight all factors regarding the merger with company XYZ and has decided it is to their advantage to reject the offer."
     
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    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    It's just my understanding of the register of the phrases. I can't imagine someone in a heated argument in casual conversation saying:

    "God damn it, Louise! You've been a pain in my ass from day one. It would have been to my advantage never to have moved in with you!" rather than "I'da been better off never moving in with you!"

    That looks to me like a mix of informal and formal registers. I may be wrong.
    That is funny! It does seem to lose its punch that way! Thanks James you made me laugh at that one. Point well taken!! :)
     
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