better off

procon

New Member
china chinese
Vendors often ask whether they can distribute kernel modules in binary form only.The answer to that question has been deliberately left ambiguous. Distribution of binary modules—as long as they adhere to the published kernel interface—has been tolerated so far. But the copyrights on the kernel are held by many developers, and not all of them agree that kernel modules are not derived products. If you or your employer wish to distribute kernel modules under a nonfree license, you really need to discuss the situation with your legal counsel. Please note also that the kernel developers have no qualms against breaking binary modules between kernel releases, even in the middle of a stable kernel series. If it is at all possible, both you and your users are better off if you release your module as free software.


What does the last sentence mean?
Does it mean "you have to prepare for some legal situations if you release your module as free software"?

thanks a lot
 
  • wantolearn

    New Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    Hi! I'm writing a short paragraph for school, and I wanted to know if you could tell me which is the verb that normally goes with "goose bumps" ? I mean, is it right to say "to have goosebumps"? Because in the paragraph I'd like to say "It gave me goose bumps" (talking about a shocking and dangerous situation) but I don't know which is the correct verb. I've also heard that it's possible to say "It made my hair stand on end" but I'm really confused. So I'll be really grateful to you if you can help me:) Thanks a lot.

    I'm a bit lost and I can't find the right place to ask about it, so sorry if I'm bothering.

    Greets!
     

    procon

    New Member
    china chinese
    "You are better off if you release your modules..." means "it will be better for you if you release your modules".




    (I have no idea what kernel modules are!)
    they are just some modules in linux system.
    and thank you very much,Saratoga.
     

    MrYeahbut

    Senior Member
    USA- English
    Hi! I'm writing a short paragraph for school, and I wanted to know if you could tell me which is the verb that normally goes with "goose bumps" ? I mean, is it right to say "to have goosebumps"? Because in the paragraph I'd like to say "It gave me goose bumps" (talking about a shocking and dangerous situation) but I don't know which is the correct verb. I've also heard that it's possible to say "It made my hair stand on end" but I'm really confused. So I'll be really grateful to you if you can help me:) Thanks a lot.

    I'm a bit lost and I can't find the right place to ask about it, so sorry if I'm bothering.

    Greets!
    Hello wantolearn
    When you want to ask a new question, go to the top of this thread page and there is a button to click to start a 'new thread' or 'ask a question' The instructions to do it are there also. That will give you a seperate thread just for your question.

    To answer your question,
    Yes it is correct either way depending on context.
    'I have goosebumps' This means something already gave them to you, but you are saying so in the present tense.

    'It gave me goosebumps' This means that something already gave them to you, but you are saying so in the past tense.

    By the way 'It made my hair stand on end' is a common expression and is more suggestive of fear than the goosebumps statement.
    Other idioms are ' It gave me the creeps' 'It scared the dickens out of me' 'It gave me the willys' There are others but they are too vulgar for this forum

    Hope this helps
     
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