Better word for "make"

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HvH1602

Member
Spanish
Hi everybody, I have a problem with using the word " make". I tend to use " make " a lot when I process language and form sentences ( maybe this is from habbits form my mother language) but in most cases, "make" doesn't match what I mean. For example:

1. Doing charitable work make teenagers become more confident ( I know this usage is wrong )

2. This opportunity makes me get promoted more easily

The problem is: make + Sbd + verb means request someone to do something and not the meaning I want to.
But I still can not find a better way to fix it, It seems that I want to use this kind of structure so much, anyone can help me with this flaw in my English? Is there any other expressions better? Please show my confuse in my thinking here
 
  • JillN

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hmmm. "Make somebody"+verb is not usually a request.

    1. Doing charitable work makes teenagers become more confident. (This is fine)
    or
    Doing charitable work makes teenagers more confident.

    2. This opportunity will get me promoted more easily.
    or
    This opportunity will make getting promoted easier.


    I'm not sure if this answers your question.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Doing charitable works enables/allows teenagers to become more confident.

    This opportunity will enable me to get a promotion more easily.
     
    Last edited:

    HvH1602

    Member
    Spanish
    Hmmm. "Make somebody"+verb is not usually a request.

    1. Doing charitable work makes teenagers become more confident. (This is fine)
    or
    Doing charitable work makes teenagers more confident.

    2. This opportunity will get me promoted more easily.
    or
    This opportunity will make getting promoted easier.


    I'm not sure if this answers your question.
    Great suggestions men. I can see there are many ways to avoid using "make" like my way. enable or allow is better substitution too. thank guys
     
    Differing slightly from Youlittleripper:

    "make" in this context is something like 'cause [something to happen]' so there are many words available, though there is nothing wrong with

    Doing charitable works makes teenagers more confident. :tick: Alternatively: Doing charitable works causes teenagers to become more confident.

    For teenagers, doing charitable works brings about increased confidence.


    Alternatively, also, "An effect of doing charitable works is that teenagers become more confident."
     
    Last edited:
    Doing charitable work makes teenagers more confident.
    Doing charitable work helps teenagers become more confident.
    Note that 'makes' is stronger than 'helps', which is stronger than 'allows' (also proposed).

    There are lots of specialized words that can do for 'makes', equally strong;

    Charitable work instills confidence in teens.
    ==
    Cause: Synonyms of cause | Thesaurus.com
     
    Last edited:

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Note that 'makes' is stronger than 'helps', which is stronger than 'allows' (also proposed).
    My take on this:

    Makes them confident (direct impact) = turns them into confident people.

    Helps them become confident (indirect)= It helps them. They become (they themselves become and are not made) confident with this help.
     

    HvH1602

    Member
    Spanish
    Differing slightly from Youlittleripper:

    "make" in this context is something like 'cause [something to happen]' so there are many words available, though there is nothing wrong with

    Doing charitable works makes teenagers more confident. :tick: Alternatively: Doing charitable works causes teenagers to become more confident.

    For teenagers, doing charitable works brings about increased confidence.


    Alternatively, also, "An effect of doing charitable works is that teenagers become more confident."
    Hi, are you sure that:
    For teenagers, doing charitable works brings about increased confidence.
    is correct? I think "increased" doesn't seem true, but unable to find a better word ?
     

    reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    1. Doing charitable work make (sic) teenagers become more confident ( I know this usage is wrong ) =
    Doing charitable work encourages teenagers to become (or: to be) more confident.

    2. This opportunity makes me get promoted more easily. =
    This opportunity enables me to be (or: to get) ) promoted more easily.

    There are, of course, several other versions of these two sentences you could conjure up.
     
    Last edited:
    I don't know why it is " increased". "Increasing" looks more familiar. Could you explain the grammar here?
    We are listing nouns, some will have adjectives. "Increased" is an adjective. Example 1. Using that toaster will result in blown fuses and, possibly, fire.

    2. This drug will bring you sleepless nights and increased appetite, likely leading to weight gain.
     
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