between A and B, from A to B (inclusive)

raymondaliasapollyon

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

I'd like to know whether "inclusive" can be placed after "between A and B," as after "from March to July" to indicate A and B are included in the range.
And how do we express the opposite idea that A and B are not included in the range? From A to B exclusive? Between A and B exclusive?

I'd appreciate your help.
 
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  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Between A and B sounds ridiculous, since there is nothing that comes between A and B (if you said between A and K, for example, it would make more sense). Can you please provide a proper context to clarify what sort of range you have in mind.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    To be absolutely clear, I'd say 'from March 1 through July 31' to include July and 'From March 1 through June 30' to exclude July.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s nothing to do with British or American English. It’s to do with logic – or the lack of it. Do you want people to understand what you mean? Or do you just want to use a particular expression for the sake of it?

    Even “from March to July” is ambiguous out of context (see #3), but “between March and July inclusive” is much worse. It implies on and off (spasmodically/on several occasions) during that period, but without further explanation, it could mean anything.

    And from March to July but not including March or July = from April to June!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Many dictionaries say "through" as in "Monday through Friday" is American English and "from Monday to Friday inclusive" is British English.
    This is true, but through (often written as thru in AE) is used in BE too. When you talk about a short period of time, there’s little chance of ambiguity. The problem arises with a month or year or century, where it’s not automatically clear whether you mean only part or the whole of that period. If a specific time is meant, you do have to spell that out, e.g. from Monday lunchtime to Friday evening; from the mid-18th to the late 19th century.

    In most uses, the two things that something is between are not “inclusive” at all — e.g. the beach lies [in the gap] between the cliffs and the sea. Which is no doubt why you think we need to add “inclusive” when talking about between two periods of time. But to my mind that just makes the statement an oxymoron. Logically, the time between two others can’t include the two periods it’s between. So, in short, it would always be clearer to say from X to Y inclusive.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    How about "He stayed in London between March and July"? Can this description be qualified with "inclusive" in British English?
    You should forget the use of "between" in such cases and use "from A to B". If there is ambiguity, then in AE you can use "from A though B". However, in BE, if you eschew the AE "through" (which I think is the clearest way) you can add words such as "inclusive", as lingo suggests or add "end of" to yield e.g., "from March 1 to the end of July 31"
     
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