Between England and herself

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opjeshke

Senior Member
Albanian
This is Bobbie Ferrar, a quiet and impenetrable guy in the Foreign Office that worked there in war and in peace times. The guy is the one in the ante-office of the Foreign Minister that ends up meeting everybody instead of him. Now I have this:

He had been there since before the war, from which he had been retrieved just in time, some said, to prevent the whole place from losing its character, just in time, too, to stand, as it were, between England and herself. She could not become the shrill edgy hurried harridan the war had tried to make her while his square, leisurely, beflowered, inscrutable figure passed daily up and down between those pale considerable buildings.

Now is the author through "herself/ she/ her" (between England and herself. She could not become the shrill edgy hurried harridan the war had tried to make her...) referring to the Queen? Because if it was just England he should have used "it", not? And isn't the Queen appointing the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs? What should I get here?

Reference: Maid in Waiting, by John Galsworthy
 
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