between the devil and the deep blue sea...

  • chico_indio

    Member
    hindi
    hey this seems to be a literal translation of this phrase...I think the same idiom should exist in spanish....and i would like to know the complete line in spanish that i have mentioned in the question ...thanx..
     

    Josette

    Senior Member
    Great Britain, English
    Namaste chico indio,

    The translation for 'between the devil and the deep blue sea...' can actually be found in the dictionary...'entre la espada y la pared'. As for the rest of the sentence, why don't you give it a go yourself as per the forum rules?

    Shukriyaa,

    Josette
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    estar entre la espada y la pared.
    In the UK one seldom hears between the devil and the deep blue sea any more, and between Scylla and Charybdis (from the story of Odysseus' perilous homeward voyage) has died out almost completely with the disappearance of a classical education. The Brits, including the BBC, now use the American phrase between a rock and a hard place instead. Younger Brits probably don't even realise it is American. But why an exile should be caught between two equally undesirable alternatives, I don't fully understand. The Spanish phrase I have given is still in common use, and means literally to be between the sword and the wall.
     

    chico_indio

    Member
    hindi
    estar entre la espada y la pared.
    In the UK one seldom hears between the devil and the deep blue sea any more, and between Scylla and Charybdis (from the story of Odysseus' perilous homeward voyage) has died out almost completely with the disappearance of a classical education. The Brits, including the BBC, now use the American phrase between a rock and a hard place instead. Younger Brits probably don't even realise it is American. But why an exile should be caught between two equally undesirable alternatives, I don't fully understand. The Spanish phrase I have given is still in common use, and means literally to be between the sword and the wall.
    i think the life of an exile is like that because life is difficult for them in their own country when their is a military dictatorship and in the country which offers them refuge which might have problems like facissm ...thats why i wanted to write this....its related to the era of the 20
    th century ....
     
    Last edited:

    roho

    Member
    english
    phrase does not have to reference an exile

    it refers to two bad choices ie

    jumping from the frying pan into the fire
     

    Desesperao

    Member
    Spain (Spanish/Catalán)
    Hi everyone,

    I wat to use this idiom:

    "Between the devil and the deep blue sea"

    Can I use it with the verb to be?

    I am/was between the devil and the deep blue sea



    Thanks in advance
     
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