Beverage of yogurt with water and salt

sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
Hi,

In some Asian countries there is a drink for sell which is a mixture of yogurt and water and salt. Once I was in Turkey I drank it. Its really delicious and a little sour. People in Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, India, etc. usually drink it beside food. It is useful for people who have blood pressure. It reduces the blood pressure. It also cures any toxication in your stomach. Turkish people call it (Ayran) etc.

But unfortunately there is not such word in English. I just want to ask of English native speakers whether they have such drink in the UK or US or not? If yes then what’s the word?

These are the links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doogh
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ayran
 
  • sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    Thanks for answering Miss Julie. But is it a common drink in there where you are? I mean is it common to drink it beside your food in where you are or it will be odd? For example in a restaurant in your city.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    It also sounds similar to the Indian drink "lassi," which can be salt or sweet. It's not an English word, obviously, but many English-speakers who have a passing familiarity with Indian restaurants will know what "lassi" is.

    (To answer the next question: it would be utterly ordinary to have it with your meal in an Indian restaurant, but you're unlikely to find it elsewhere.)
     

    hopefultoo

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Kefir grains are available in the UK (I have some which I use to make a substitute for buttermilk in some bread recipes) but I have never seen the drink on sale here. I did drink some in Istanbul in 1972, though. I didn't much like it.
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    Sounds like kefir to me.
    Kefir sold at shops are not the same as the drink sb70012 asked about, kefir is a fermented milk similar to yoghurt, my guess is that buttermilk is more like it. But it's possible to add more water and some salt to kefir, or any other fermented milk product, to get such a drink. I would call it lassi, even if lassi also can be sweet. It's a perfect drink for hot summer days, or with spicy food.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I didn't know about kefir, but I know about lassi. I think the latter is more well known in the English-speaking world.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Oops, an over-generalisation then! :( Perhaps Indian cuisine is more well known among BrE speakers? (After all, curry and chips was hailed as Britain's national dish!)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I don't think keffir is what you are asking about. It is a fermented drink made differently from yogurt. Buttermilk is is made using starter different from the one used to make yogurt.

    I have seen doogh in a Turkish restaurant, and also sold in some specialty stores. I believe I've had lassi that was salted rather than sweet in an Indian restaurant. I don't think either of these have an English name, and they are not likely to be known except by people who are familiar with the cuisines each is associated with.

    Buttermilk is the drink we have that is closest to what you describe, though the flavor is different. It was once possible to order a glass of buttermilk in most restaurants. Now they are much less likely to have it. (I like it, myself.)
     
    Last edited:

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    I forgot about the drink yoghurts you can buy here in Sweden, it's not a mix of yoghurt and water, it's a more "runny" yoghurt and there are different brands and it's available in several fruity flavours. Some of them are made with probiotics that are considered being good for the health, and there are also varieties without lactose. It's something you drink as a snack, rather than something you serve with a meal.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Turkish people call it (Ayran) etc.
    Not only the Turks call it that. :) We do as well. Here it is something of a national drink though I suspect many nations would claim it as their own. For this reason I would automatically say ayran in English. If anyone is familiar with lassi, let it be lassi (if lassi is the same - I hear it has a sweet version and the ayran does not).
     

    hopefultoo

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Buttermilk is different from kefir and different again from yoghurt. However, all three can be interchanged in some recipes.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The soured milk drink I recall was called "buttermilk". As a child I thought it was awful. I have not seen it in years so I don't know what I would think of it as an adult.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    As a Turk and also as someone loving Ayran so much, I wanted to jump in. Yes, we call it Ayran, and I haven't heard anything about how to call it with a different name. Kefir may sound similar to Ayran, but I have no idea whether it totally suits or not.
     
    Last edited:

    saeed1

    New Member
    persian
    hi,originaly that is come from iran and then expand to other country.but in Persian they called ,,dough,,.in English you can call yogurt drink or buttermilk.but originaly that is DOUGH.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Personally I call it 'ayran' because I drank it a lot in Turkey. Recently I saw something in a US supermarket that was basically the same as ayran, but unfortunately I don't remember what it was called in the US. It's not something widely drunk here though, although that could change.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    I didn't know about kefir, but I know about lassi. I think the latter is more well known in the English-speaking world.
    No, the flavor of lassi is sweet but the one I was looking for is sour or salty (water+yogurt+salt)
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    No, the flavor of lassi is sweet but the one I was looking for is sour or salty (water+yogurt+salt)
    You guys are starting to go in circles here.:) Check posts 5, 15, 18, and 20: lassi can be salty or sweet, and according to one poster, the original lassi is with salt, not sugar.
     
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