Beyond my dreams

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stevenhang

Banned
Japanese
I found this sentence on the Internet:

"You are the woman beyond my dreams."

- I know the meaning of "beyond" but does this sentence mean "You are the woman who my heart is looking for."? :)

Thanks very much!
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Usually "beyond my (wildest) dreams" is used to describe something in quantitative terms: "riches beyond my wildest dreams." Overall, I wouldn't call the phrase "you are the woman beyond my dreams" idiomatic at all. "You are the woman of my dreams" sounds natural, if more prosaic in comparison.
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    ... does this sentence mean "You are the woman who my heart is looking for"?
    Sort of, I guess. They're both rather nice things to say to a lady.

    More literally it means that before meeting said woman you would not have been able to imagine someone like her.
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    I found this sentence on the Internet:

    "You are the woman beyond my dreams."

    - I know the meaning of "beyond" but does this sentence mean "You are the woman who my heart is looking for."? :)

    Thanks very much!
    It means that the woman is so wonderful that she outshines any woman that you could ever have imagined.

    It is more common to say, "You are the woman of my dreams" which means that the woman is perfect for you and she embodies a kind of perfection that, up until that moment, you thought could only exist in your dreams.

    To say "beyond" your dreams would imply that she is so perfect that your mind was not even capable of dreaming up such perfection i.e it was beyond the powers of your mind to dream her up.

    Now, idiomatic of not, I'd love to hear a guy say either one. ;)
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    There is something mildly self-contradictory in:

    1. You are the woman beyond my dreams.

    "Beyond my dreams" implies, as has been said, that the woman was previously unconceivable.

    But the use of "the" implies prior knowledge.

    MrP
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    [/ the woman was previously unconceivable.
    QUOTE]
    I would rather hope you meant "inconceivable". It would be completely beyond my dreams to visualise an "unconceivable person of any sex, considering that every human on this world has been conceived.
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Thanks, Gasman; but I wanted to avoid the connotation of "incredulity".

    ("Unconceivable" is safely lodged in the OED.)

    All the best,

    MrP
     

    MikeLynn

    Senior Member
    Unfortunately, "Unconceivable" cannot be found in the New Oxford American Dictionary on my computer. Well, it might be the unfortunate Atlantic divide we're dealing with here, but that's the way it probably is and I'm afraid that gasman was right from his point of view :confused:BTW, I'd ask for a raise, but some people, Britons and, some, Canadians ask for a rise. The bottom line is that we all need/want/ask for more money and better pay :D
     
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