beyond one's expectations vs to my surprise

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Kee Lin

Senior Member
Chinese
beyond my expectations

I read this post first. And I was wondering If I could use this to say something surprising but doesn't have any good or bad connotations.(I incline to the view that you tends to use it with positive things) I find even my teachers use this interchangably with to one's surprise. My idea on ''to one's surprise'' is that it work with either good connotation or bad connotation. Am I right?

For example:
1. Beyond my expectation, he doesn't speak his native language. (Sounds awkward?)

2. To my surprise, he doesn't speak his native language. (sounds ok?)

3. He has achieved a lot more more than this year's quota, which is beyond our expectation. (I don't know how it sounds...)

3. To my surprise, he has achieved a lot more than this year's quota. (sounds ok?)
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    1. Beyond my expectation, he doesn't speak his native language. (Sounds awkward?):cross:

    2. To my surprise, he doesn't speak his native language. (sounds ok?):tick:

    3. He has achieved a lot more more than this year's quota, which is beyond our expectations. (I don't know how it sounds...):tick:

    3. To my surprise, he has achieved a lot more than this year's quota. (sounds ok?) :tick:

    'beyond my expectation(s)' is used when you expected one thing, and what you receive is a lot better. It is very positive.

    'to my surprise' can relate to good things or bad things. It just means that you were surprised!
    'To my surprise, he didn't even say hello.'
    'To my surprise, my son got better than expected exam results'.
     
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