bias/predictive validity

littepuppy1

Member
chinese-china
Awareness of cultural differences in intelligence raises difficult questions concerning testing and the use of test scores. Should bias in testing be eliminated at the expense of the predictive validity of the test? < --- > Perhaps we need to give consideration to yet another aspect of intelligence – that is, our attitudes regarding intelligence. A cross-cultural understanding of differences in the definitions and processes of intelligence should help to deepen our appreciation and respect for cultures different from our own, and help us to find similarities as well as differences among people.

what does "Should bias in testing be eliminated at the expense of the predictive validity of the test? " mean?

< Sentence removed to comply with 4-sentence limit on quotation -- Rule 4. Cagey, moderator >
 
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  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Where did you see this, littlepuppy1? Please name the book or website or other source, and tell us the title.

    Also, what are they discussing? Please tell us in your own words what the topic is and what the author seems to think about it.
     

    littepuppy1

    Member
    chinese-china
    the title of the essay is "cultural differences of intelligence"
    i wonder why "bias" is eliminated at the expense of validity of the test? if there is no bias, there will be no validity of the test? what does the author mean?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    This is my try at explaining.

    At the moment, intelligence tests that have been worked out over the years are fairly good predictors of success in school, for instance. However, they contain cultural bias. For instance, they may ask questions about things one group of people may have more experience with than another group, which would be a built-in bias. In an English speaking country, one part of the test may be based on a sophisticated use of language, but people whose first language is not English may not do as well on that part.

    If they get rid of that part of the language-based part of the test, they get rid of the bias, but then perhaps there may be people who get high scores but the don't do well in school, because they don't have high skills in the English language, and English language skill is needed in school.

    In this case, the test is less biased but loses its validity as a predictor of success in school.

    Note: this is just an example. Intelligence tests try to test intellectual ability and not what people have learned, so they usually are designed not to test language skill. However, I don't know enough about actual intelligence tests to give a real example of a biased question in a real test. I suspect that the article contains better examples based on actual intelligence testing.
     

    littepuppy1

    Member
    chinese-china
    th
    This is my try at explaining.

    At the moment, intelligence tests that have been worked out over the years are fairly good predictors of success in school, for instance. However, they contain cultural bias. For instance, they may ask questions about things one group of people may have more experience with than another group, which would be a built-in bias. In an English speaking country, one part of the test may be based on a sophisticated use of language, but people whose first language is not English may not do as well on that part.

    If they get rid of that part of the language-based part of the test, they get rid of the bias, but then perhaps there may be people who get high scores but the don't do well in school, because they don't have high skills in the English language, and English language skill is needed in school.

    In this case, the test is less biased but loses its validity as a predictor of success in school.

    Note: this is just an example. Intelligence tests try to test intellectual ability and not what people have learned, so they usually are designed not to test language skill. However, I don't know enough about actual intelligence tests to give a real example of a biased question in a real test. I suspect that the article contains better examples based on actual intelligence testing.
    thank u so much
     
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