Bid on a post/assignment

Broca

Senior Member
Italiano
Hi everyone,
in a Marc Cameron novel, there's a chapter about the American deputy chief of mission (called Ron) in Cameroon. She refers to his wife.

Her “Learn something new every day” list [...] grew exponentially each time Rod bid on a new country assignment.
Cameroon was a promotion—at least on paper. Rod was the DCM
[...]. He’d run the political section in Croatia during the last tour. There had been a lot to love about that posting [...]. But that’s how Rod’s career had worked out, bid on and get a great post, then promote to one that was . . . slightly less great.

What does bid on means here? Is it something like to stand as a candidate, to run for?
Thank you.

Andrea
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Andrea. It should mean that he applied for an assignment to a new country. Whoever made the decisions about consular staffing would review applications for reassignment from people who were trying to move up in the consular system and advance their careers.
     

    Broca

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Thank you for your answer.
    However, "it should mean"... Is it an uncommon use of bid on? Does it sound strange to you?

    Andrea
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Is it an uncommon use of bid on? Does it sound strange to you?
    It seems to be a loose meaning for bid, which I did find a little strange. However, I'm not any sort of expert on what diplomats and consular employees might use in their private jargon; perhaps the word really isn't strange or inappropriate in that context.
     
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