bid out

dichelson

Senior Member
Italy/Italian
Hello: I have a contractor in my novel who says "I bid that work out for thirty grands". Now, considering he says he did the work, what is the "out" for? Thank you
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    As far as I know, this should mean that he took bids for the job and hired other people to do it for thirty grand. I checked on Google, and which seemed to confirm this understanding. So I understand your puzzlement if the contractor did the work himself.

    Maybe someone with contracting or business experience will have a better explanation.
     
    Last edited:

    dichelson

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    I have the text at hand now. Here it is:

    "Now Taylor's place, that was a classic! Bid that job out at thirty grand. Know how much it cost me to build it? Fifteen! Taylors were happy, and you bet I was happy! Hope they never check the insulation under the floor - it isn't there!"

    Maybe he had somebody else do the actual work. On his part, he supervised it and bought the material. What do you think?
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    Bid that job out means that was the amount he would charge Taylors for the job. You can't make any assumptions about who did the work.

    The out isn't necessary. He could have said it a number of ways:
    Bid that job at....
    My bid on that job was...
    I made a thirty grand bid for the job
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    Normally, I would use bid out the job if I were the customer and looking for bids from contractors. But, in the context that it was used, it is the same as bid on. Don't get stuck on the out.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    We all seem to agree with Dictionary.Com's definition of the phrasal verb:
    bid out: To offer (work) for bids from outside contractors.
    Yet the context certainly seems to require that we understand it as if he had "bid on" the job. Perhaps this usage is more common than I realized. Possibly the author himself was confused. Desert Cat's advice seems good.

    It is possible that the speaker carried out some complicated crooked scheme involving bidding out the job and keeping the money that I can't figure out. The speaker does seem to be crooked. However, this seems less likely.

    (Desert Cat: here's to your 1001st posting!)
     
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