bid / tender

Tamar

Senior Member
Israel, Hebrew
In another thread I opened here I used to word bid, as in: the contractor who won bid no. X.

I've just found out there's another word: tender.
Wikipedia, for example, says this: (law) A formal offer to buy or sell something.

When a governmental company wants to find a constructor for a job (road infrastructure, for example (that's what my company does...), does it issue a bid or a tender? What are the right terms?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The authority puts the contract out to tender. Companies submit bids for it. (Those are the basic uses of the two terms; there may be others.) The winning bid wins the tender.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The authority puts the contract out to tender. Companies submit bids for it. (Those are the basic uses of the two terms; there may be others.) The winning bid wins the tender.
    I can't agree with the bit in red. The winning bid and the winning tender are the same thing. The winning bid (or tender) wins the contract (or perhaps the bidder of the winning bid/tenderer of the winning tender wins the contract)

    The authority puts it out to tender, and the contractors submit tenders (or tender bids :)).

    The relevant bits from the COED are
    bid 1
    verb (bids, bidding; past and past participle bid)
    1 offer (a certain price) for something, especially at an auction. > (bid for) (of a contractor) tender for (work).

    noun
    1 an offer to buy something. > an offer to do work or supply goods at a stated price.
    tender2
    verb
    1 offer or present formally. > (often tender for) make a formal written offer to carry out work, supply goods, etc. for a stated fixed price.

    noun a tendered offer.

    PHRASES
    put something out to tender - seek tenders to carry out work, supply goods, etc.
    The only difference is the derivation: Old English for bid and French for tender
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm with Andy: a bid and a tender are the same thing to me.

    When a governmental company wants to find a constructor for a job (road infrastructure, for example (that's what my company does...), does it issue a bid or a tender? What are the right terms?
    A government department or agency would issue an "invitation to tender".
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    That is the origin of the use of the noun 'tender' (and the verb 'tender' certainly means "offer, bid, provide"), but there are certain uses where it behaves more like the process the authority performs, or the overall process of seeking and offering bids: at close of tender; the award of the tender; tender bids; the highest bidder by tender.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    That is the origin of the use of the noun 'tender' (and the verb 'tender' certainly means "offer, bid, provide"), but there are certain uses where it behaves more like the process the authority performs, or the overall process of seeking and offering bids: at close of tender; the award of the tender; tender bids; the highest bidder by tender.
    I still can't accept the phrase in red, since it is the contract that is awarded. Tender bids is almost tautology, and all that highest bidder by tender means is that the process of bidding for the contract was through the submission of tenders - which is again somewhat tautological - but does, I suppose, exclude bidding by Dutch auction.

    Have you got some examples of tender being used to mean the overall process, particularly the award of the tender?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It may well depend on the context.
    In my experience in UK public sector procurement, the tender is submitted by the prospective supplier in response to an "invitation to tender". The successful supplier is awarded the contract, by "award of contract".

    This happens close to the end of a process of specification and negotiation whose complexity depends on the scale of the task.
     

    Tamar

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew
    I'm translating something that is already after the bid/tender is over and there is already a winner. If I got it right, this doesn't matter and both bid and tender can be used? :confused:
    Would it make any difference if used one instead the other?
     

    enkku

    New Member
    German
    The winning bid (or tender) wins the contract
    Could somebody please comment on the following? Which of these are correct?

    the contractor who won the tender/bid
    the contractor who won the tendering
    the contractor who won the tendering process/procedure/?
    the winning contractor of the ...
    the winner contractor of the...
    the contractor who was tendered the contract
     

    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    It may well depend on the context.
    In my experience in UK public sector procurement, the tender is submitted by the prospective supplier in response to an "invitation to tender". The successful supplier is awarded the contract, by "award of contract".

    This happens close to the end of a process of specification and negotiation whose complexity depends on the scale of the task.
    I don't understand the part in red. Is it tautology or necessary?
     

    wilsonkr

    New Member
    Brazilian portuguese
    I was reading this and couldn't get to a conclusion. It wasn't clear to me and now still not clear. Could you answer the examples given which word would be best applied? Or if they are or not exchangeable?
     

    basquesteve

    New Member
    english
    I have no idea how I ended up here on a completly different search but as I am here, having spoken English for 58 years, and still unable to understand its made up rules

    Its

    the contractor who won the tender was/is
    or the tender winner is/was /the winning contractor is/was
     
    Last edited:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I was reading this and couldn't get to a conclusion. It wasn't clear to me and now still not clear. Could you answer the examples given which word would be best applied? Or if they are or not exchangeable?
    I agree that the use of 'tender' and 'bid' is very confusing. Please give us the specific sentence in which you might use these words, along with a description of the situation. It will make it easier for people to give a clear and accurate response to your question.
     
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