big step

Agito a42

Senior Member
Source: Colombiana (2011), an American movie.

A prison bus arrives at a police precinct. There's only one prisoner in it. He's in handcuffs and wears a sack over his head. Before he steps off the bus, the US marshal that escorts him says: Alright, big step. Down you come.

Could you tell me please what big step means here? Does he tell him to take a big step (a movement made by putting one foot in front of the other) or does he mean "beware of the big step in front of you" (step = a support for the foot in ascending or descending)?
 
  • mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Since the context is getting off a bus, it would mean that the step down from the bus's step(s) to solid ground is a big (i.e. 'tall') one.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Source: Colombiana (2011), an American movie.

    A prison bus arrives at a police precinct. There's only one prisoner in it. He's in handcuffs and wears a sack over his head. Before he steps off the bus, the US marshal that escorts him says: Alright, big step. Down you come.

    Could you tell me please what big step means here? Does he tell him to take a big step (a movement made by putting one foot in front of the other) or does he mean "beware of the big step in front of you" (step = a support for the foot in ascending or descending)?
    Yes, it's a warning and implicit advice, as others have stated.
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    Thank you, everyone. I've got it. Decided to go with mgarizona's explanation, "step":
    WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English said:
    1. a movement made by lifting the foot and setting it down again in a new position, as in walking:
    He took a few steps to the right.
     
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