bigoted-on-duty

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antobbo

Senior Member
UK
italian, Italy
Hi chaps, I was wondering if this construction bigoted-on-duty (pretty much like idiot on duty) can be used as an adjective, for example, the "bigoted-on-duty professor that gave me the homework" or something similar.
thanks
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Your first problem is that 'bigoted' is an adjective and 'idiot' is a noun. Next, idiot on duty, is unhyphenated and has no context. Finally, would it be possible to have a full sentence as an example?
     

    antobbo

    Senior Member
    UK
    italian, Italy
    hi thanks, I haven't seen this anywhere, I was just wondering whether it can be used in a sentence. A complete sentence could be something like "Can you see that guy standing over there, he's the bigoted-on-duty today".
    I have seen slightly different examples, like in an office context somebody who's annoyed with somebody might refer to the person as "the bitch on duty" for the sake of argument. That I have seen used, and so I wonder if anything like a bigoted-on-duty or something similar exists or is currently used.
    thanks
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I would not use <adjective/participle-on-duty>; I have never heard or seen it used; it doesn't work. I might use <noun-on-duty> there is nothing wrong with the construction.
     
    Last edited:

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    So Shawn says something pigheaded about, say, "Mexicans coming into the USA and taking jobs away from honest Americans." Would you say:

    He's the bigot here. or
    He's the bigoted here.

    Clearly you would say "He's the bigot here." "He's the bigoted here" is incorrect.

    Similarly:

    He's the bigot-on-duty today. :tick:
    He's the bigoted-on-duty today. :cross:

    Now, we can have a discussion about whether it needs to be hyphenated or not, but that's more a matter of style.

    EDIT: Oh! Maybe you're confused about the part of speech of "bigoted." "Bigoted" is only an adjective. The noun for "a bigoted person" is "a bigot." English can't form nouns from adjectives the same way that Italian, for instance, can.
     

    antobbo

    Senior Member
    UK
    italian, Italy
    thanks guys, after your comment I suppose I should have enquired about the bigot-on-duty/bigot on duty as opposed to the bigoted-on-duty/bigoted on duty. SO do native speakers use this form at all (bigot-on-duty/bigot on duty) or does it sound really strange? I seem to understand from lucas-sp that in the US it is ok, how about in Britain?
    thanks
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think anybody has said that "bigot-on-duty" is a common or normal expression in any form of English. If you have a bigot, and he's on duty, then he would be the bigot on duty or the duty bigot. The words have their ordinary meanings. The only possible confusion would arise from the person hearing or reading it wondering why anybody would have a duty roster for bigots.
     
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