bill/receipt/invoice....

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by cat-can, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. cat-can Senior Member

    vancouver
    CATALONIA, catalan and spanish
    What a mess! Could somebody explain when I should use each one?
     
  2. pontchartrain Senior Member

    United States, English
    An invoice is a bill. It is a request for payment.

    A bill is something you receive in a restaurant or something sent from a company or an office to an individual person.

    An invoice is usually a bill which one company sends to another company. It is a bit more formal.

    A bill can have a somewhat negative connotation. Example: I got a bill from from my doctor's office and it was HUGE!

    A receipt is a document stating you have paid the bill or invoice.
     
  3. cat-can Senior Member

    vancouver
    CATALONIA, catalan and spanish
    It is clear now! Is there any other word meaning similar things that could also confuse me some time?
     
  4. pontchartrain Senior Member

    United States, English
    In the United States a bill can also mean a proposed law.

    I believe a "bill of sale" is an itemized receipt, but this is a somewhat archaic term not widely used anymore.

    A receipt can mean a cooking recipe, but this is an archaic nineteenth century usage you will rarely find anymore.
     
  5. AngieAranibar

    AngieAranibar Senior Member

    Lima
    Spanish - Perú
    It was very helpful. Thanks! :)
     
  6. UltiMATE jugador

    UltiMATE jugador Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    English-US (New Jersey)
    Also of note: in restaurants and cafes (and I think only in restaurants and cafes), we refer to the bill or invoice we say the "check". Occasionally in a restaurant we will say "the bill", but usually we say check. And we would never say "the invoice" at restaurant...
     

Share This Page

Loading...