Billed product vs Invoiced product

< Previous | Next >

Marco PCA

Senior Member
Spanish - Mexico
Hi everyone,

I've got this sentence:

Thus, you record revenue only when a customer pays for a billed product or service, and you record a payable only when it is paid by the company.

Question:

I'd like to know if I could use "an invoiced product" instead of "a billed product", and if so, know if the meaning would still remain the same.

Thank you,
Marco
 
  • wolfram_beta

    Senior Member
    English - American
    How is this material being used? Who is the audience? Is it, for example, for a legal contract? I think the answer might depend on how technical the audience is and how much trouble you could run into if you aren't extremely precise with the language.

    In my opinion, "billed" and "invoiced" are synonyms. However, there could be nuances with respect to how the company operates.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with wolfram_beta. It might be associated with the country's tax laws. Revenues might need to be entered onto the accounts for tax purposes when an invoice is raised, not paid, so the company may have a system of billing customers using something other than a commercial invoice, and then issue the formal invoice after the money has been paid.

    This sounds daft to me, but having just received yesterday the invoice for a machine which was paid for a month ago and delivered last week, anything is possible in the commercial world.
     

    Marco PCA

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Thank you very much, that's what I wanted to know. So, in general circumstances both are synonyms (in everyday English) but if we're talking about specific or accounting terms they doesn't necessarily mean the same thing, right?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top