Billy is putting/holding his arm around the Queen's neck

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wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.

The front cover of the book Billy and the Queen (by Stephen Rabley) shows two people standing close together and posing for the camera. Billy has put his arm around the Queen's neck.*

I would like to express the same idea using the present continuous tense. I've come up with two sentences:
1. Billy is putting his arm around the Queen's neck.
and
2. Billy is holding his arm around the Queen's neck.

I think that #2 is better. Am I right?


Thank you.


* Billy is in Madame Tussaud's in London. He is actually standing next to a waxwork of Queen Elizabeth.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Billy is putting/holding his arm around the Queen's neck.:cross:
    "Billy has his [outstretched] arm across/on/resting on the Queen's shoulders."

    This is a picture of a woman with her arms around a man's neck:

     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    No.

    This girl is hugging a man:



    To hug - to hold something/someone tightly so that they touch (usually, press against) your body.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    If the Queen wanted to encourage Billy to put his arm around her shoulder, would she say:

    "Put your arm around my shoulder"?
     
    Last edited:
    In AE, I would say "Put your arm around my shoulders," since in reality both shoulders are being embraced and the plural seems more standard to me than the singular. In this imaginary conversation, though, probably we shouldn't have Queen Elizabeth speaking AE even though total fantasy would allow for it. :)
     
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