Birds are nice to see in nature.

DodoSVK

Senior Member
Slovakia - slovakian language
Hello.

Please help me with this:

I guess I can say "Birds are nice animals to see in nature. "

Is it also grammatical like this?:
"Birds are nice to see in nature."

Do they have the same meaning? Is the only difference in those two sentences that in the latter the additional information that the birds are animals wasn`t provided?

Thank you.
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Birds are nice animals to see in nature seems to me an unlikely, though grammatical, sentence because a) in nature is an odd phrase and b) the reference to birds as animals seems unnecessary.

    I prefer Birds are nice to see in the countryside/in the open, if this is what is meant.
    Where does the first sentence come from?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    If you mean something like the opposite of "It's not nice to see birds in cages":
    It's nice to see birds in their natural surroundings.
     

    DodoSVK

    Senior Member
    Slovakia - slovakian language
    To e2efour:

    The sentence was made up by me. I was inspired with the sentence "Grizzly bears are impressive animals to see in the wild" which comes from a website dealing with infinitive phrases....

    To e2efour and ewie:

    I am just trying to find out how to use infinitive phrases correctly and what are the exact meanings of their specific usages.
     

    DodoSVK

    Senior Member
    Slovakia - slovakian language
    To help me understand this thread I would like to ask this: :)

    The infinitive phrase of the sentence "Grizzly bears are impressive animals to see in the wild" expresses that
    1. They are animals which we can see in the wild.
    Or that
    2. Seeing Grizzly bears in the wild is impressive.

    Thank you.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Perhaps you could tell us which website this is? That's called source.

    I really don't like that particular infinitive construction. The difference between the grizzly bears sentence and your own is that grizzly bears are impressive is a complete understandable sentence. It means 'we are impressed when we see grizzly bears'.

    Birds are nice in the wild
    is meaningless - it can't mean 'we are nice when we see birds in the wild and it can't mean 'birds are not nice in cages'.

    What we are talking about in #2 is our experience of 'seeing birds in the wild'.
    If you want to use an infinitive construction, you need a 'dummy 'it'.
    -It's nice to see birds in the wild.
    A gerund would also be possible.
    -It's nice seeing birds in the wild.

    Edit I hadn't seen your #5. Maybe the above is helpful. We don't need the word 'animals' at all, so take it out.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I really don't like that particular infinitive construction.
    No, me neither. I much prefer a dummy it.

    The grizzly bear example strikes me as verging on the illiterate; the best solution I can think of for it is this:
    Grizzly bears are impressive, especially when seen in the wild. [Unless you're terribly terribly blasé about your wildlife, grizzlies are always impressive:rolleyes:]
    (Technically it's not 'seeing grizzlies in the wild' that's impressive: it's just 'grizzlies in the wild' or 'the sight of grizzlies in the wild'.)
     

    siares

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    DodoSVK, you may be interested some theory from wiki in post 15
    slow to walk on
    which lists adjectives usable in 1)tough movement and 2)pretty constructions
    1 Chris is easy to please. It is easy to please Chris.
    2 Lee's mattress is too lumpy to sleep on. *It is too lumpy to sleep on Lee's mattress.


    Impressive is listed in the first but maybe it should be also in the second?
     
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