Birth anniversary: does it connote the person's being dead?

Englishmypassion

Senior Member
India - Hindi
Hello Teachers,
Namaste!
Does the term "birth anniversary" have a connotation or explicit meaning of the person (whose birth is being celebrated) being dead?
Example: His 85th birth anniversary was celebrated yesterday across the state.

Thank you very much.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    1. I don't think I've ever seen "birth anniversary"-- is it an Indianism? Usually we'd say: The 85th anniversary of his birth was celebrated...
    2. It does suggest he's dead, otherwise we'd simply use "birthday".
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Thank you very much, sd and Keith.
    Yes, it's quite common in India. Even Wikipedia has a page "150th Birth Anniversary of Swami Vivekananda" and "The Times of India", India's most esteemed and read English newspaper, also uses the expressions among other Indian English newspapers. I too find it used for dead people.
    (I was aware that "birthday" is the common term in English, especially for people still living.)
     
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    aasheq

    Senior Member
    English (Estuary)
    The google results for "birth anniversary" (with speech marks) are virtually without exception from Indian sites.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The google results for "birth anniversary" (with speech marks) are virtually without exception from Indian sites.
    That being the case, you're in a better position than I am, Emp, to answer your own question. In Indian English, does "birth anniversary" imply that the person is dead?
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Thank you everybody.
    Yes, Loob, I have always found it used in the media and newspapers for dead people's birthdays, especially famous people's birthdays, which are celebrated widely ( and famous people's probably because the media and newspapers talk only about them.).
    So I would take Mr Keith's words.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    As EMP says, the term "birth anniversary" is often used here. And I believe it doesn't just imply but specifically means that the person is dead.

    It is his 120th birthday = He takes care of his health.

    It is his 45th birth anniversary = He died young.

    It is his 400th birthday - Typo for 40 or a line from a Harry Potter book.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thanks, Barque - interesting!:)

    I think the equivalent in today's BrE might be "Today is the Xth anniversary of his birth".
     
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    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    But unless it's obviously an age to which people don't live, "__th anniversary of his birth" doesn't actually say that he's dead. If the number is "150th", it does—but not if it's "45th" or "85th".
     
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