birth anniversary or birthday jubilee

Mher85

Senior Member
Armenian
Hi, people. The President sends a congratulatory message to a painter on the occasion of his birthday. Is it correct to say "The Armenian President congratulated the painter on his 65th birth anniversary or birthday jubilee and wished him good health and further creative success."
Do I have to mention "birth" here?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    If you don't mention "birthday" (which is the common term) there's no way to tell what event the anniversary of which is being celebrated. :rolleyes:

    (This is the first time I've encountered "birthday jubilee).
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with sdgraham. We would say, "congratulated the painter on his 65th birthday ..."
    That would be enough. :)
     

    Mher85

    Senior Member
    Armenian
    If you don't mention "birthday" (which is the common term) there's no way to tell what event the anniversary of which is being celebrated. :rolleyes:

    (This is the first time I've encountered "birthday jubilee).
    I agree with sdgraham. We would say, "congratulated the painter on his 65th birthday ..."

    That would be enough. :)
    People, but it is not just a birthday, it is the 65th birthday, a jubilee one. Is not there a more pompous word or expression for this kind of occasions?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I'm not familiar with a 'jubilee birthday'.
    However, if that is what you have in mind, you would probably say 'jubilee birthday'.

    I don't know of a word to use with significant birthdays, but perhaps someone else will. :)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Sorry mher, but your use of "jubilee birthday" fits neither the WRD definitions nor common usage, at least in AE.

    Speaking as one who reached that 65th birthday some time ago, there was no name or it, much less a pompous one.

    As such, I don'rt see how we can help.
     

    Doktor Zlo

    Member
    English (Canadian)
    People, but it is not just a birthday, it is the 65th birthday, a jubilee one.
    That may be true in your culture and/or native language.

    However, for most native speakers of English, "[ordinal number] birthday" really is enough, even when the ordinal number describing the birthday ends in a 5 or a 0. This fact is verified by the general nonuse of the type of word or expression you've asked about.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Mher85, a jubilee is a celebration of an anniversary (a wedding anniversary, for example).
    Although one's birthday is technically an anniversary of the day one was born,
    we don't refer to it as an "anniversary" in English.

    I remember attending my grandparents' Golden Jubilee (their 50th wedding anniversary celebration).
    Some people even referred to them as "the golden jubilarians."

    In 2012, there was the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in the U.K. (celebrating 60 years of the Queen’s reign).

    Below are the special names for the 25th, 40th, 50th, 60th, 75th, and 100th anniversaries.
    As noted above, these do not apply to birthdays.
    Source: Wikipedia.


     

    Mher85

    Senior Member
    Armenian
    Thank you, Language Hound! Like you, I also attended my grandparents' Golden Jubilee. Until now I thought that it was not a common practice among other nations to celebrate Golden Jubilees.
     

    Silver_Biscuit

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I referred to my 25th birthday as a silver jubilee! It was a joke, though, I was just playing with the language. I actually love the idea of referring to a birthday as a jubilee, because it is such a lovely word. However, it's not done.
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    In some countries in which I have taught I have been at a loss to know how to respond when friends there have greeted me on my birthday with very formal, and sometimes quite long, expressions. I was most impressed by the way the young guests at the sixth birthday party of a friend's grandson's here in the Czech Republic all shook his hand and gave what seemed to be a quite formal mini-speech.

    We British tend to be content with simply 'Happy Birthday'. My 60th was quite special. (Most people who know me were amazed that an exercise-phobic, smoking, near-alcoholic person would live that long.) Some travelled quite a way to help me celebrate, but all most said was simply 'Happy Birthday'. A few, implicitly referring to my unhealthy life style' did say 'Congratulations'.
     

    Mher85

    Senior Member
    Armenian
    In some countries in which I have taught I have been at a loss to know how to respond when friends there have greeted me on my birthday with very formal, and sometimes quite long, expressions. I was most impressed by the way the young guests at the sixth birthday party of a friend's grandson's here in the Czech Republic all shook his hand and gave what seemed to be a quite formal mini-speech.

    We British tend to be content with simply 'Happy Birthday'. My 60th was quite special. (Most people who know me were amazed that an exercise-phobic, smoking, near-alcoholic person would live that long.) Some travelled quite a way to help me celebrate, but all most said was simply 'Happy Birthday'. A few, implicitly referring to my unhealthy life style' did say 'Congratulations'.
    The same is in Armenia. It is a common practice among Eastern peoples to raise long toasts. I would say you British do not like to talk at all. My impression is that you are quite cold and indifferent to surroundings, though I have never been to Britain and I might be wrong. :)

    I referred to my 25th birthday as a silver jubilee! It was a joke, though, I was just playing with the language. I actually love the idea of referring to a birthday as a jubilee, because it is such a lovely word. However, it's not done.
    In Armenia, we refer to "special" anniversaries, i.g. 25th, 40th, 50th etc., as "jubilee anniversaries." Here jubilee is an adjective which means something like "festive" or "solemn." For example, "This year Armenians are going to celebrate the 90th jubilee anniversary of the famous actor Ervand Manaryan." I understand that this is not a standard English expression, but this is how we say it in Armenian.:)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I can confirm that we also call birthdays ending in 0 and 5 'jubilees'. We use that same word pronounced our way. :) We have a birthday every year and a 'jubilee' every 5 years. I have no idea how this can be expressed in English without coercing English-speakers to adopt our word, which also happens to exist in English. :D Perhaps we should be descriptive and say things like 'round-number birthday' or 'special 65th birthday', etc.
     

    Mher85

    Senior Member
    Armenian
    I can confirm that we also call birthdays ending in 0 and 5 'jubilees'. We use that same word pronounced our way. :) We have a birthday every year and a 'jubilee' every 5 years. I have no idea how this can be expressed in English without coercing English-speakers to adopt our word, which also happens to exist in English. :D Perhaps we should be descriptive and say things like 'round-number birthday' or 'special 65th birthday', etc.
    I think that "special" is not bad, but, anyway, it does not connote the meaning of "jubilee." A 43th birthday can also be special for one reason or another.
     
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