birthday suit

matissewhite

New Member
italian
In palestra dove vado attaccata alla porta della sauna c'e' scritto che non sono ammessi i "birthday suit" che sono??
Baci, Chiara
 
  • Flamingo66

    Senior Member
    England English
    Would the Italian version have any connection to ones birthday?
    Maybe I wanted to say "so...will you be wearing your birthday suit" on someones birthday.

    Thanks.
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    By "the Italian version" do you mean "il costume adamitico" suggested by ToscanoNYC?

    Unfortunately this isn't connected to a person's birthday. It refers to Adam (and Eve);)
     

    Flamingo66

    Senior Member
    England English
    Yes I meant "il costume adamitico"
    So "birthday suit" or an Italian equivilent cannot be used as I described?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Yes I meant "il costume adamitico"
    So "birthday suit" or an Italian equivilent cannot be used as I described?
    Well, I suppose you could turn up naked on someone's birthday!:D

    Seriously, no, as Murphy says, they are two completely different things in Italian. Costume adamitico means "naked". If you were to buy a new suit or dress for a birthday or some other occasion you'd say "un vestito nuovo" (dress) or "un completo nuovo" (suit).

    EDIT: Thinking about it, in Campania they also say "come mamma ti ha fatto" (come mamma l'ha fatto) to mean stark naked. This might be a regional thing: there's a famous song in Neapolitan "Cumm' mammete t'ha fatt'", so this may well be the Italianised and therefore local version of that! Campani, ci siete?
     
    Last edited:

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    In English we do sometimes make a joke of it:

    - It's my birthday tomorrow.
    - Ah, so will you be wearing your birthday suit?

    Obviously we can't make a similar joke in Italian because "adamitico" is unambiguous.:D
     
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