birthplace, deathplace, ...

< Previous | Next >

ebrahim

Senior Member
Persian
Hi
The city a person was born in is called his birthplace.

The city a person died in is called his deathplace. (but why the spellchecker says it's wrong?! Isn't it common?)

The city a person was buried in is called his ...? (can we say "the burial place")
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    .... The city a person died in is called his deathplace. (but why the spellchecker says it's wrong?! Isn't it common?)
    "Deathplace" does exist, ebrahim; the (big) Oxford English Dictionary has citations using it dating from 1790.

    But yes, you're right that it's unusual. I can't imagine using it myself, and if you look at the google ngram comparing "birthplace" and "deathplace", you can see that "deathplace" is much less common than "birthplace". Even "place of death" is, in my experience, only used in official forms.
     

    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    "Deathplace" does exist, ebrahim; the (big) Oxford English Dictionary has citations using it dating from 1790.

    But yes, you're right that it's unusual. I can't imagine using it myself, and if you look at the google ngram comparing "birthplace" and "deathplace", you can see that "deathplace" is much less common than "birthplace". Even "place of death" is, in my experience, only used in official forms.
    thanks for your explanations. Now how do you think I could say "the burial-place of Mary is Jerusalem"?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top