bis, ter

smirf

Senior Member
UK English
Does anyone know what bis means here (legal document)

el Artículo 282 Bis 3

thanks
 
  • Mist

    Member
    Spanish (Mexico)
    Hi:
    I think it's like a part of the article 282, it's like saying 282 section "a" or "b", but let's wait and see what do experts have to say. Is it from Laws?
     

    crilobos

    New Member
    español chile
    Mist is right. It's a matter of legislative technique.
    Sometimes the government needs to modify a law which number of articles is, as to say, "full". Adding a new article in such circumstance would create a huge "headache" to lawyers who will need to get used to a new articles organization. Considering this, some parliaments use this technique, they would add new parts to existing articles instead of creating articles with new numbers.
    Following this general idea, besides the expression "bis" (wich, by the way, is roman for "second"), it's not rare to find laws with expressions like "articulo 23 ter" or "artículo 56 quater" wich corresponds to the same problem (where "ter" is roman for "third" and "quater" for "fourth").
    Believe me that, as lawyers, we appreciate the effort of the government to avoid us some suffering...
    I know my english is not good enough, but i hope it will help you to understand the issue you were consulting about.
     

    Chalon

    Senior Member
    Viña del Mar-Chile-Español
    hola! tengo problemas para traducir la palabra bis para un artículo de la ley federal de fianza

    es para una demanda. Gracias
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    perikita

    Senior Member
    México-Español
    Does anyone know what bis means here (legal document)

    el Artículo 282 Bis 3

    thanks

    I know Mist and Crilobos answered this question long time ago, but i would like to know if there is an exactly term I could use to translate bis, or is it doesn´t matter if I use section or any other word... I made my question here to not open a new thread with the same question.

    Muchisimas gracias, por la ayuda que me pudieran brindar :)
     

    David

    Banned
    Art. 282 Bis is simply an article inserted in the code between Articles 282 and 283. Bis would only be used if there was already an Art. 283.

    If more articles are inserted, they would be called 282 ter., 282 cuart., 282 quintus, 282 sextus, etc., simply Latin for second, third, fourth, fifth, etc. As Crilobos says, it saves renumbering a whole code. I would translate Art. 282 Bis (3) as "Art. 282-Bis (3)". Anybody familiar with European or Latin American codes would know what that it means The Article following Art. 282, clause (or paragraph or sub-section or whatever that particular code uses), 3.
     

    vikingo45

    Member
    Costa Rica - English
    Hola Marya Lizeth / Hi HesterPrynne:

    Yes "Bis" is accepted in English/American law terminology. It is included in Black's Law Dictionary. It means twice or repeat.

    Regards,

    vikingo45
     

    mariobaracus

    Member
    USA, English
    The above explanations have been very helpful for me, but I want to be absolutely clear on this, and I hope someone in the forum can help (as you often do so well).

    So, in a legal document, would it be correct to translate "bis" as "Para. 2"...? Here's my context:

    "...en el artículo 22 bis de la Ley de Contratación Administrativa..."

    and my translation:

    "in Article 22 Para. 2 of the Administrative Contract Law...."

    I understand that "bis" is recognized by certain legal entities, but I have seen my client's proofreaders scoff at this term and would like to avoid potential problems resulting from leaving it in the Latin. In other words, if we HAVE to translate "bis," would "Para. 2" work?

    Thanks very much!
     

    clapham junction

    New Member
    Spanish - Spain
    The above explanations have been very helpful for me, but I want to be absolutely clear on this, and I hope someone in the forum can help (as you often do so well).

    So, in a legal document, would it be correct to translate "bis" as "Para. 2"...? Here's my context:

    "...en el artículo 22 bis de la Ley de Contratación Administrativa..."

    and my translation:

    "in Article 22 Para. 2 of the Administrative Contract Law...."

    I understand that "bis" is recognized by certain legal entities, but I have seen my client's proofreaders scoff at this term and would like to avoid potential problems resulting from leaving it in the Latin. In other words, if we HAVE to translate "bis," would "Para. 2" work?

    Thanks very much!

    I know it has been a long time, but just in case someone has the same doubt in the future: no, you cannot translate "bis" as "para.". It is absolutely misleading. There can be, say, a Section 12.1, a Section 12.2, and afterwards, a section 12 bis, which is a completely independent Section and not a part of Section 12. The bis is used, as explained above, when certain articles are inserted into a given act by an amendment to it. Article 12 bis would be inserted between art. 12 and 13, and using the "bis" avoids having to change the whole numbering of the law.
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hola Marya Lizeth / Hi HesterPrynne:

    Yes "Bis" is accepted in English/American law terminology. It is included in Black's Law Dictionary. It means twice or repeat.

    Regards,

    vikingo45

    But can it also it mean “section”?

    “Article 282 twice” and “article 282 repeat“ don’t make sense.
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I know it has been a long time, but just in case someone has the same doubt in the future: no, you cannot translate "bis" as "para.". It is absolutely misleading. There can be, say, a Section 12.1, a Section 12.2, and afterwards, a section 12 bis, which is a completely independent Section and not a part of Section 12. The bis is used, as explained above, when certain articles are inserted into a given act by an amendment to it. Article 12 bis would be inserted between art. 12 and 13, and using the "bis" avoids having to change the whole numbering of the law.

    My current text says, “...artículos 181 bis en relación al 181 Ter ambos en su párrafo primero, del Código Penal vigente...”.

    And while I’ve read every entry here, I’m not clear on how to translate it. Is “ter” used in English the same way “bis” is?
    Should my translation be as follows?

    ”...articles 181 bis paragraph one in relation to 181 Ter paragraph one...”?

    Or rather, this way?

    ”...articles 181 section two, paragraph one in relation to 181 section three paragraph one...”?
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Should my translation be as follows?

    ”...articles 181 bis paragraph one in relation to 181 Ter paragraph one...”?
    I'm not an expert in Law and I'm not a native English speaker but I'd like to say how I see it anyway. Bis and ter are part of the name of the article (being the other part of the name the number) so I wouldn't translate it. If your readers know any Latin, they won't struggle with it. On the other hand, the Official Journal of the European Communities, translates it. What would be artículo 181, artículo 181 bis and artículo 181 ter, becomes in the English version of the document article 181, article 181a and article 181b. But you aren't in the EU but in the USA... so if you want to adapt it to your local uses, you'll have to look for a law including that sort of articles (usually ammended laws) to see how it's made there.
     

    SergioPOE

    Senior Member
    Spain, English and Spanish
    "bis" is a, "ter" is b, "quater" is c, etc.
    Artículo 28 bis is Article 28a, 28 ter is 28b, etc.
    At least that's the convention in EU regulations.
     
    Top