Bit of a drive for her

Erbab

Senior Member
Türkçe
''As you know, I live on my own and once a week my sister comes over. Bit of a drive for her, but she brings the shopping.''


What is the meaning of ''bit of a drive for her'' here? Is it like '' Driving is a bit of a problem for her''?

Thank you for your helps!
 
  • glamorgan

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    ''As you know, I live on my own and once a week my sister comes over. Bit of a drive for her, but she brings the shopping.''


    What is the meaning of ''bit of a drive for her'' here? Is it like '' Driving is a bit of a problem for her''?

    Thank you for your helps!
    It means that to visit him, his sister must drive a significant distance from her own home. It doesn’t give any indication of how far away she lives, although the phrase usually carries a suggestion of understatement, so a “bit of a drive” is probably quite a long one.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    There is an omitted "It is a" before "bit". "Bit of" is understatement, as glamorgan says. Both of these are typical in British speech.

    Please do give sources for quotations as it helps us make sense of what is being said; I very much doubt the sentences would sound natural in American English, so saying where you found them will save American members from puzzling over their meaning.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's perfectly useful in AE, too, but I think we would tend to not drop those first words, on average.

    The use of "shopping" is what sounds odd. :)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, '(it's a) bit of a' functions as a kind of minimiser. In other words, it plays down the degree of the activity, and generally functions as a politeness device or as an understatement (as Uncle Jack and glamorgan said). We have some set phrases like someone being in a bit of a pickle.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, we use that one, too.

    A bit of a tight spot...
    A bit of a nuisance...

    Here's a headline from a football game on Saturday:

    "We ran into a little bit of a buzz saw,” Austin Peay coach Will Healy said ...

    [They lost 45-0, which basically means they were scored on seven times without scoring themselves.]
     
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