Bitchy

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Antonio

Senior Member
Mexico/Spanish
Hi Group,

I don't have at least, a clue of this word, is different that bitch I can tell. Can someone please help me out.
 
  • bofico

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    es un adjetivo que significa

    "estar de muy mal humor"

    sin querer ser yo un cerdo chauvinista, comentaría que se usa generalmente para describir el temperamento femenino.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Antonio said:
    I don't have at least, a clue of this word, is different that bitch I can tell. Can someone please help me out.
    A bitch is a noun. "Carolina is a bitch."
    Bitchy is an adjective. "Carolina is bitchy."

    Is the meaning clear, or no? If you know what the word bitch means, then "bitchy" should not be different.

    Side note:
    Although I don't condone this language, the word "bitch" is sometimes used as a synonym for woman.
    "Who is going to the concert with you?"
    -"My bitch."
    Here, "bitch" refers to this person's girlfriend.
    (Although, this is very much so street talk)

    A bitch is formally known as a female dog. However, it only takes that specific meaning when speaking about dogs. If you simply said the word "bitch", most will think of the offensive meaning first.

    Is this clear?
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    ok I got it, but at least, give some meanings or synonymous of the word bitchy to understand better the whole context of the word, and of course, your point too.
     

    Dorian

    Senior Member
    Canada English
    As Bofico pointed out in Spanish (which I had to submit to Babel to translate), it is often used to describe women. Depending on when it is used, it might be insulting, so be careful how you use it. A man would not use it to describe another man, except perhaps in the gay community.
    Antonio said:
    give some meanings or synonymous of the word bitchy .
    Here is the Merriam Webster definition: : "characterized by malicious, spiteful, or arrogant behavior"

    You wanted synonyms. Here goes:
    "Whatever I say to her, she complains."
    "You sure are acting menopausal today." NOTE: this is insulting, be careful how you use it.
    "The woman in that office always bites my head off when I talk to her."
    "She is always cutting other people down."
    "Watch out, you say the wrong thing to her, and she'll scratch your eyes out."​
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    bofico said:
    Of course, the quintessential synonym for "bitchy" is "on the rag"
    (la cual jamás usaría yo para no ser un maleducado).
    Bofico: I am sorry, but I must disagree somewhat. Although teaching Antonio English slang is important, I think your choice of words was a little harsh.

    Antonio: Although, Bofico is correct somewhat. the quintessential synonym for "bitchy" is used to describe a woman who is menstruating, or has her period.
     

    bofico

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    antonio,

    Nicole tiene toda la razón. Favor de descartar la opción sugerida por mí en la intervención anterior. Ese concepto no tiene la más mínima utilidad en un foro como la presente. :(
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    ok just to undestand the whole point here. Bitchy is a women "characterized by malicious, spiteful, or arrogant behavior" or if they are having their period and they compain a lot, and if I don't stand that women. Can I say "Stop acting so bitchy". am I right?

    If I am missing some meanings of this word, please let me know.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    How would you say that in Spanish?
    ("Stop acting so bitchy!")

    By the way, you could also say, "Stop being a bitch!"

    I looked it up on the site, and it gave bruja as the spanish word. In English, I thought bruja translated to witch. Calling someone a witch does not carry a serious meaning. So, what is the Spanish equivalent?
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    I would say in spanish:

    "No seas tan repelona o Deja de ser tan repelona" I think this second sentence suits better "for stop being so bitchy". "Repelona" means complaining a lot.

    Another way to say it is: "Deja de ser tan testaruda" "No seas tan necia" "Deja de comportarte como una niña chiflada".

    Oh, and by the way, what does it mean Bitching or Bitchin'. Can you give me some examples to understand better the context or is the same thing as Bitch and Bitchy.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Antonio said:
    Oh, and by the way, what does it mean Bitching or Bitchin'. Can you give me some examples to understand better the context or is the same thing as Bitch and Bitchy.
    Yes, you are right. These are very different variations of the same word.
    Bitchin' is another word for cool, awesome, excellent.

    Dude, your shirt is bitchin'.
    The ride on that rollercoaster was bitchin'.
    Our trip to the ocean was bitchin'.

    But . . .
    My girlfriend will not stop bitching.
    She is a bitch.

    ¿Está claro ahora?
     

    Celeste

    Senior Member
    Argentina, Spanish
    VenusEnvy said:
    How would you say that in Spanish?
    ("Stop acting so bitchy!")

    By the way, you could also say, "Stop being a bitch!"

    I looked it up on the site, and it gave bruja as the spanish word. In English, I thought bruja translated to witch. Calling someone a witch does not carry a serious meaning. So, what is the Spanish equivalent?
    I can't think now of an equivalent in "Argentinean Spanish" for bitchy. What we usually say, slang of course!, for "Stop acting so bitchy!" is No seas histérica o
    Dejate de histeriquear! (rude) or Esa mina es una histérica!(specially if she is young) or Vieja histérica (if old)...
    Histeriquear has another meaning but I think we are in the wrong forum...!
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Celeste said:
    No seas histérica o
    Dejate de histeriquear! (rude) or Esa mina es una histérica!(specially if she is young) or Vieja histérica (if old)...
    Histeriquear has another meaning but I think we are in the wrong forum...!
    Please educate me. :)
     

    csisfun

    Member
    Singapore/English
    Bitchin' is not correct in formal writing. It's just sort of a "redneck" (gringo) way of saying bitching.

    "Her mother is bitchin' again"

    It's also a way "bitching" is pronounced, except without the "g" sound.


    I think the translation for bitch is "puta". Isn't it?
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Antonio said:
    And the form to write the word is bitchin' or "bitching" or both are ok.
    Bitching = complaining
    Bitchin' = excellent

    Bitching
    Correct: "My girlfriend will not stop bitching."
    Incorrect: "Your shirt is bitching." (My shirt is complaining????? :confused: )

    Bitchin'
    Correct: "Your shirt is bitchin'"
    Incorrect:"Your girlfriend is bitchin'." (My girlfriend is excellent???? :confused: )
     

    Celeste

    Senior Member
    Argentina, Spanish
    Well VenusEnvy, I will try to explain myself as clear(ly) as possible. Many argentinian girls and young woman (as you get older you have much knowledge of what you really want, mostly!) have this difficulty to express to the opposite sex what they really want, and to decide if they want it or not to go out with somebody, this is "histeriquear" (it is not in the Es. diccionary) It can be also apply to men. It has provocacion (encitment?) and desire involved. It would be as "coquetear", but in a hysteric way!
    I hope you understand the concept properly! :p
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    So, "histeriquear" and "coquetear" involve wanting to become sexually involved with another person. So then, when a woman is acting "bitchy" , her emotions are getting out of control?
     

    bofico

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    Nicole,

    "Coquetear" means "to flirt"*, nada más, nada menos.

    I think that when Celeste said

    It would be as "coquetear", but in a hysteric way!

    what she may have meant was

    It [histeriquear] would be as "coquetear", but in a sexual way!

    By the way, congratulations on your masterful rendition of the meaning of "bitchin'", which in actuality, brought a tear to my eye.

    The term "Bitchin'" originated in the surfer/skateboarder community in Southern California in the mid-sixties [don't ask me how I know]. FYI, the following spelling would be correct in any lexicon:

    bitchin'

    Its meaning conforms exactly to that of Nicole's definition. Lately I have detected a very slight resurgence of the term, yet with no apparent link to anyplace in particular. Yet I kind of suspect that this example of "retrospeak" may have something to do with a Hollywoodesque recreation.

    As for Mr. (Mrs.?) Csisfun's totally gratuitous, and incorrect comment, and as a Redneck myself, I take great umbrage at his unconscionably frivolous contribution to the thread.

    Spanks on you, Mr. Csisfun!



    __________
    *A lost art in contemporary society--but what do I know?
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    VenusEnvy, I personally suggest you, that go with the examples and the meanings that I gave you, suits better, your and my context too, of the word. Because otherwise, you will get confused. Let me tell you something in advance, I think that Mexican Spanish and North American English, the slang is pretty much alike, of course, in some ways your slang is slightly different that ours. But at least, I can get the idea of what you're trying to say to me.

    I like in my particular case, American English, because I'm used to it all the time. For me, British English and Australian English, they are similar in some ways, but in other ways, they are totally different. Is like in my case, the Spanish from Spain, is totally different from the Spanish in Argentina or in Central America (Guatemala, Panama, Honduras, El Salvador, etc.) is Spanish, of course, the Spanish Slang from other contries I understand, but I don't use it, because they don't use it in Mexico.

    The same case as yours (you use the same slang that people use, picked up on the streeet or in popular TV programs, like Friends for example, or made it up all the time by Teenagers, Kids and News programs, right?)

    So, I suggest you, that if you wanna learn spanish, go with the Mexican Spanish, that's my best piece of advice to you.

    And if you have further questions about my answers, please let me know.
     

    bofico

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    Nicole,

    Antonio just gave you good advice.

    The only thing I would add is that you must know the difference between norma culta y norma popular.

    Yes, Mexican Spanish is the bomb, but it won't work well for you if, for example, you were trying to tell a group of Porteño investors why they should buy your firm's shares or products.

    The best thing you can do is know the difference between one dialect and another, and respect those differences.

    But being able to shift into the so-called "norma culta register" will always garner the respect of your interlocutors, as you being the well-educated speaker.
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Wow! What an educational thread. Just a couple comments, though.

    VenusEnvy, I'm not sure that "Your girlfriend is bitchin'." is always incorrect. "Dude, that's your girlfriend? She's bitchin'." :D

    bofico, say it isn't so !! Flirting is NOT a lost art!

    Celeste, correct me if I am wrong, but if I understand "histeriquear" correctly, is this basically the stage of young girlhood that we refer to as "boy crazy," and (I hesitate,) "dicktease?" :confused:
     

    Celeste

    Senior Member
    Argentina, Spanish
    VenusEnvy said:
    So, "histeriquear" and "coquetear" involve wanting to become sexually involved with another person.
    Yes, but don't really wanting to. (histeriquear) just to be desirable...

    VenusEnvy said:
    So then, when a woman is acting "bitchy" , her emotions are getting out of control?
    No, for "acting bitchy" could be "ser histérica" : No seas histerica o dejate de histeriquear
    here histeriquear it is the same word but with different meaning : ill/bad-tempered, a difficult person
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    bofico, alas, here in the land of the frivolous lawsuit, "harass" is a hot topic. (No pun intended.) Maybe they are afraid of getting sued.
     

    Celeste

    Senior Member
    Argentina, Spanish
    Antonio, please don't get confused!!
    I don't know the exact translation for bitchy into spanish, but down here if you hear No seas histerico/a! would also mean no seas dificil, don't be difficult /bad tempered/
    please refer to first bofico's reply;)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    bofico said:
    Antonio,

    De acuerdo. Este "thread" a mí me está poniendo histérico también. :rolleyes:

    Chau.
    ja ja ja


    Ok, everyone, thank you for your help.
    Gracias todo por la ayuda. Ahora, entiendo este concepto mejor.

    Antonio and Bofico: I will eventually concentrate on differentiating dialects. But, as for now, I am still beginning. So, I ask my boyfriend many questions. Most of the responses to my questions have been from people from Spain, Argentina. (He is from Mexico) When I ask him to explain some words, sometimes he hasn't the slightest idea what they are! :D
     

    mtf

    New Member
    UK, English
    On the subject of "bitch", a French student recently told me that he had caused offense to an elderly lady in England while trying to explain that he'd enjoyed the "beaches" on a recent holiday. The "ea" sound in "beach" is very difficult for French speakers, apparently.
     

    Virginie

    New Member
    Belgium, French
    Well obviously the words 'Bitch ' and 'beach' aren't said the same way, phonetically ( if i remember correctly) Bitch= and Beach = [i:], in beach the sound 'i' is a bit longer, but French people don't make that distinction when they speak French, which can lead to some misunderstandings :D
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    VenusEnvy said:
    Side note:
    Although I don't condone this language, the word "bitch" is sometimes used as a synonym for woman.
    "Who is going to the concert with you?"
    -"My bitch."
    Here, "bitch" refers to this person's girlfriend.
    (Although, this is very much so street talk)
    In this particular case "Bit**" means my girlfriend or woman?

    I have another example "Who died last week asked Shelly - "My bit**" answered Sofia"

    "My bit**" can be considered my best friend in a way according to this example or not?
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hey Man, take it easy. If you wanna say something to me, please send me a PM or if you do not wanna answer my question, is not a problem at all. You could at least thank me, because I kept my word, to censor the word myself. I made the question, because I still have some doubts, about what VenusEnvy posted, not me, I didn't posted the question just the doubts only.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Antonio-
    It was a joke! In the US there are a ton of jokes that begin,
    "How many (fill-in-the-nouns) does it take to change a light bulb?"
    The answers are always a punchline to a joke.

    When I was saying, "Why does it take three women with PMS to change a light bulb--WELL, IT JUST DOES, OK?--It's because the three women with PMS are bitchy. Bitchy sometimes means that you have no rhyme or reason to why you are ticked off--you just ARE, OK? (being more bitchy)

    Women with PMS sometimes feel that it gives them the right at certain times of the month to be as crabby as they want--and they have a valid reason for being crabby.
    "Why are you so crabby?"
    "WELL, I JUST AM, OK? --would be a shouting emotional, bitchy response.

    My post was not a personal affront--and if you feel it is offensive, I will gladly remove it. I thought it was kind-of funny, and that it depicted the epitome of a "bitchy" response to an innocuous question--the epitome of the definition of bitchy.
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    Originally Posted by VenusEnvy
    Side note:
    Although I don't condone this language, the word "bitch" is sometimes used as a synonym for woman.
    "Who is going to the concert with you?"
    -"My bitch."
    Here, "bitch" refers to this person's girlfriend.
    (Although, this is very much so street talk)

    In this particular case "Bit**" means my girlfriend or woman?

    I have another example "Who died last week asked Shelly - "My bit**" answered Sofia"

    "My bit**" can be considered my best friend in a way according to this example or not?
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Bit--
    I have not heard that term before. I was never into using the word, bitchy--until my little Shih-Tzu had pups. Here, before my eyes was an animal--properly called a bitch, snapping at our other dog for trying to acquaint himself with her puppies, and snapping at her own puppies for biting her too hard! I have not said it to anyone, because it is a word that makes the mouth that says it as ugly as the word tries to paint another person.
    Does Bit carry the same negativity?
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Antonio,

    Yes, in the concert example, it means girlfriend. I hate hearing it, but it is used that way. I have never heard of someone calling their best friend "my bitch." ( I would think it was very odd to hear someone say that about a friend that had recently died. )

    MJ - Antonio is writing "bit**" because he is trying to censor himself, so that he doesn't offend anyone.

    Antonio, it's probably a little late to worry about it in this thread. :D

    :)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    VenusEnvy said:
    So, I ask my boyfriend many questions. Most of the responses to my questions have been from people from Spain, Argentina. (He is from Mexico) When I ask him to explain some words, sometimes he hasn't the slightest idea what they are! :D

    Poor my girlfriend!! If you try to explain something we, argentinos, say ... poor Mexican man! Our words and idioms have at times not only different meanings from the Mexican's but also completely contradictory ones!! :eek:

    "No seas una mina histérica!" >>> usually hubbies say this to their poor wives, as a kind of insult (erm... well an INSULT) because they say "we, women are hysterical" :rolleyes:
    We usually say that we feel or are "histéricas" when our period is coming... :mad:

    BUT "histeriquear" has a sexual connotation and it means you excite some boy and then go away and leave the poor man alone!! :eek: ( I think this is called "prick-teaser" or something like that.

    Bye Venusita! :p :p :p
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Antonio: Sorry for not responding to your question. I had forgotten all about this thread (it's so old). Here goes . . .
    VenusEnvy said:
    Side note:
    Although I don't condone this language, the word "bitch" is sometimes used as a synonym for woman.
    "Who is going to the concert with you?"
    -"My bitch."
    Here, "bitch" refers to this person's girlfriend.
    (Although, this is very much so street talk)

    Antonio said:
    In this particular case "Bit**" means my girlfriend or woman?
    Yes.

    Antonio said:
    I have another example "Who died last week?" asked Shelly
    - "My bitch," answered Sofia.
    "My bitch" can be considered my best friend in a way according to this example or not?
    Not that I can imagine! MAYBE in some places, street terminology is as so.
    In this example, though, using the word "bitch" to refer to someone who has died is highly inappropriate, in any region.

    Did you make up this example on your own, or have you heard it said somewhere?

    From what I know, "My bitch" (bitch as a noun) can mean one of only a couple of things:
    My wife / girlfriend
    My dog (female)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Artrella said:
    My poor girlfriend!!
    Pardon the correction chica!


    Artrella said:
    "No seas una mina histérica!" >>> usually hubbies say this to their poor wives, as a kind of insult
    I got it.


    Artrella said:
    We usually say that we feel or are "histéricas" when our period is coming... :mad:
    Yah, the men say, "Be careful with her! It's that time of the month . . ."
    :mad:

    Artrella said:
    BUT "histeriquear" has a sexual connotation and it means you excite some boy and then go away and leave the poor man alone!! :eek
    Ooooooook, I get it now.

    Artella said:
    I think this is called "prick-teaser" or something like that.
    lol Yes, among other things.

    ¡Mil gracias mi Artrellacita!
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Artrella said:
    BUT "histeriquear" has a sexual connotation and it means you excite some boy and then go away and leave the poor man alone!! :eek: ( I think this is called "prick-teaser" or something like that.
    Thank you, Artrella!! :D
    I have wondered about that since post #25.
    "Dicktease" or "pricktease" can be used for that.

    :)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    VenusEnvy said:
    Pardon the correction chica!

    ¡Mil gracias mi Artrellacita!

    Not pardon girl!! Thank you for correcting and teaching me!! :p

    ¡Mil gracias mi Artrellacita! >>> AWWW that's so sweet!! :p :p :p




    Today I'm happy! :thumbsup:
     
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