blackberry, blueberry, cranberry

< Previous | Next >

K-Milla

Senior Member
Mexico-Spanish
hello!

I was wondering if you know what is exactly a "blackberry".

I suppose that it could be different from region to region and could it be the same as "blueberry" for you?

:D
 
  • K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    Thank you for the url Mirlo, but unfortunatelly I couldn´t see the information apart from the picture of the blackberries.

    Actually, I was thinking that the subject would be interesting for everyone, because sometimes we called differently.

    In Mexico, the name is "zarzamora" as you said, but in my region, we called "zitun". I have heard that many people get mixed up when you talk about berries [there are so many!] that you could confussed blackberries with blueberries
     

    vicdark

    Senior Member
    Español, Bolivia
    En botánica "berries" se refiere al grupo de las "moras". Así,. como dice Mirlo "blackberry" es la zarzamora. Crankberry es el "arándano". Existen otras "berries" como los "blueberries" (? en español).

    En tecnologia celular más moderna, "Blackberry" es el nombre comercial de un teléfono celular avanzado que entre otras aptitudes tiene la de permitir recibir y enviar correo electrónico.
     

    K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    Hello!
    What you think about this:

    blueberry ['blu:bərɪ] n Bot arándano: I will need lots of blueberries to make two pies, necesitaré muchos arándanos para hacer dos tartas

    cranberry ['krænbərɪ] nombre arándano: I serve cranberry sauce on Thanksgiving Day, el día de Acción de Gracias sirvo salsa de arándanos


    Wordreference...
     

    Pelgar

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi K-Milla,
    In the Southern U.S. a blackberry grows on a bush with many thorns. They are rather lumpy and have many small seeds that get stuck between your teeth. In my area blackberries grow wild and are very often found along the edge of rural roads. Although some people do cultivate them they are normally in the wild. They make a wonderful cobbler.
    Blueberries are normally cultivated and grow on much larger bushes, without thorns, than blackberries. They also make a very good cobbler but I prefer blackberries.

    Pelgar
     

    Mirlo

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
    Debe ser que en algunas reginoes las llaman igual pero aqui te mando una imagen de "Cranberries"= arándanos:


    saludos,
     

    K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    The reason why I am interested in the "berries" is because I am working on a project that involve that sort of fruits.

    Here in Mexico, you could find blackberries on the road, as you said Pelgar. In the other hand, there are a lot of fields and growners of Blackberries but not of blueberries or cranberries.

    I am not sure if we have blackcurrant as a "farm"
     

    vértigo83

    Senior Member
    México-español (Spanish)
    A better translation for cranberries would be "arándano rojo", since "arándano" is "blueberry".
     

    K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    Thank you vértigo83 for the explanation about "arandano rojo" and Pelgar, Blackcurrant is one of the most famous fruits in the UK.

    I think that the USA you use cranberries and blueberries, but not blackcurrant, which I guess that it must be almost the same as blueberries.
     

    K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    I found this:

    Main Entry: black currant
    Function: noun
    : a European perennial currant (Ribes nigrum) bearing aromatic edible black berries that are used especially in flavoring liqueur (as cassis); also : the fruit
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    En botánica "berries" se refiere al grupo de las "moras". Así,. como dice Mirlo "blackberry" es la zarzamora. Crankberry es el "arándano". Existen otras "berries" como los "blueberries" (? en español).

    En tecnologia celular más moderna, "Blackberry" es el nombre comercial de un teléfono celular avanzado que entre otras aptitudes tiene la de permitir recibir y enviar correo electrónico.

    I thought moras were mullberries and baya was the group name for berries in general.
     

    K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    Unbelievable the way words can change everything!

    Mora, baya, frutas del bosque=Berries, their just have the colour, shape and flavour different.

    ╚berry
    ╚loganberry
    ╚dewberry
    ╚boysenberry
    ╚blackberry
    ╚currant
    ╚lingonberry; mountain cranberry; cowberry; lowbush cranberry
    ╚cranberry
    ╚wintergreen; boxberry; checkerberry; teaberry; spiceberry
    ╚blueberry
    ╚huckleberry
    ╚bilberry; whortleberry; European blueberry

    :D
     

    María Madrid

    Banned
    Spanish Spain
    I thought moras were mullberries and baya was the group name for berries in general.
    That's right, berries are bayas. A common name for berries is "frutos del bosque" but it's not very scientific.

    Creo que los blueberries son más bien endrinas, con lo que se hace el pacharán y arándanos los rojos que no son exactamente cranberries, porque los cranberries no se comen crudos y los arándanos sí. Saludos, :)

    frutos del bosque

    más frutos del bosque
     

    K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    Creo que los blueberries son más bien endrinas, con lo que se hace el pacharán y arándanos los rojos que no son exactamente cranberries, porque los cranberries no se comen crudos y los arándanos sí. Saludos, :)
    [/URL]
    Entonces, para ti ¿cuál es el signficado de "cranberries"?
     

    María Madrid

    Banned
    Spanish Spain
    Sencillamente decía que creo que no es el mismo fruto, no sé cuál será el nombre, pero ni siquiera sé si hay "cranberries" en España, con lo cual tampoco es de esperar que haya un nombre específico, como tampoco lo hay para diversas bayas que se dan en el norte de Europa pero no en España. Esta sería una buena pregunta para nuestro querido Ilmo... Saludos, :)
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    That's right, berries are bayas. A common name for berries is "frutos del bosque" but it's not very scientific.

    Creo que los blueberries son más bien endrinas, con lo que se hace el pacharán y arándanos los rojos que no son exactamente cranberries, porque los cranberries no se comen crudos y los arándanos sí. Saludos, :)

    frutos del bosque

    más frutos del bosque
    According to the images I found on the Internet, the endrinas are not blueberries, but in the plum family (prunus). They grow on trees. The images that came up when I typed in "arándanos" were of blueberries, with an occasional picture of a cranberry. The cranberries were called arándanos agrios.
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    I'm not so sure endrinas grow on trees, rather larger bushes than those in Scandinavia. In any case the taste is the same, and they look very similar too. Maybe they use the same words for both...

    blueberry=blåbär

    endrinas
    María, the pictures you have in your links are of two different plants. The blueberry one does look like what I would call blueberries. Notice how it grows on a soft, green stem. The berries grow in a cluster and have a round ring at the blossom end. Note how the endrinas grow on a woody stem, smaller clusters (only 2 or 3 each). The endrina fruits have a crease on one side (which you can only barely see on one of the fruits in the image you provided). And the leaves of the two plants are different. I don´t know how big the endrina fruits are because according to what I read they are smaller than a normal plum (ciruela), but the blueberries are usually only about 1/2 inches (about 12.5 mm) in diameter. A typical plum, at least here in the US, is about 1 1/2 to 2 inches (38 to 50 mm) in diameter. Also endrinas have a large seed in the center, blueberries do not.

    Endrina

    arándano
     

    María Madrid

    Banned
    Spanish Spain
    Ok, if you say they're different I'll assume they are... but I don't think endrinas have large seeds. Endrinas are about the same size as blueberries (at least the ones I've seen in Scandinavia, I remember buying HUGE bluerries in the US). You seem to know a lot more about berries than me so maybe I've just been using the wrong word all this time and what I call endrinas are just arándanos. As for the pictures you've posted, that endrina looks too red and the shape is certainly different.

    Just one last thing, this Wikipedia entry says blueberries come from the US. I don't think that's correct, bluberries grow wild all over Scandinavia and Baltic countries, but I don't know if it's the same kind of blueberry as in America. Saludos, :)
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    Just one last thing, this Wikipedia entry says blueberries come from the US. I don't think that's correct, bluberries grow wild all over Scandinavia and Baltic countries, but I don't know if it's the same kind of blueberry as in America.
    It says that blueberries are native to North America and eastern Asia. That doesn't mean that they don't grow in Scandinavia -- it means that they didn't originate there.
     

    K-Milla

    Senior Member
    Mexico-Spanish
    I read, can´t remember where, that berries are all over the world, and they just have some differences and usually they classified them with the scientisct name properly and the "normal" name doesn´t matter.

    Maybe that is why is so confussing.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    If you type Vaccinium myrtillus in wikipedia, you get Bilberry.
    The easiest way to distinguish the bilberry is that it produces single or pairs of berries on the bush instead of clusters like the blueberry. Another way to distinguish them is that while blueberry fruit meat is light green, bilberry is red or purple.
     

    saritalbg

    Senior Member
    United States
    Hola,
    Quisiera saber si mis paisanos mexicanos tinen alguna sugerencia en cuanto al uso 'popular' de la traducción de la palabra berries al español 'mexicano'.

    ¿Por qué palabra se conoce 'berries' en México?

    Gracias.
     

    Deidelia.

    Senior Member
    Español (México)
    Bueno, yo suelo comprar una bolsa de 'Mixed Berries' y son moras, fresas y cerezas.
    El nutriologo me dice que son bayas. Nunca me ha dicho que se llamen 'frutos rojos' o 'frutos del bosque', pero sí he oido llamarlos también así. Aunque mucho menos.

    Quiza bayas sea un término más de receta de cocina o algo así y no uno que se incluiria en el menú de un exquisito restaurant, por mucho que las crepas o el helado del postre las llevaran.

    Saludos
     

    normaelena

    Senior Member
    USA Spanish
    Hola,
    Quisiera saber si mis paisanos mexicanos tinen alguna sugerencia en cuanto al uso 'popular' de la traducción de la palabra berries al español 'mexicano'.

    ¿Por qué palabra se conoce 'berries' en México?

    Gracias.
    Aunque no soy de México, me parece que he escuchado también la palabra arándanos.
     

    la_machy

    Senior Member
    Español de Sonora
    Los arándanos son una clase de bayas. Al igual que las otras que ya se han mencionado y que como dijo ManPaisa también se les conoce como frutos rojos o frutos del bosque. (Mmmm...llenos de antioxidantes y deliciosos!!).


    Saludos






     

    mirx

    Banned
    Español
    Aunque no soy de México, me parece que he escuchado también la palabra arándanos.
    Los arándanos son una especie de bayas. Yo, que no acudo a restaurantes fisnos, siempre los he conocido con el término génerico de bayas.
     

    Moritzchen

    Senior Member
    Spanish, USA
    Hoy estaba en un supermercado en Buenos Aires y me llamó la atención que habían frascos de dulces y mermeladas con etiquetas en español e inglés y decían "dulce de arándanos" y luego blackberry jam, o blueberry jam. Me hizo pensar que acá les dicen arándanos a las bayas. Yo siempre pensé que los arándanos eran las cranberries.
     

    Gregory MD

    Senior Member
    Chile - Español
    berry = baya y por lo menos por aquí tenemos las siguientes:
    Frutilla / fresa = strawberry
    Mora = blackberry
    Arándanos = blueberry
    Frambuesa = raspberry

    Existen más bajo la categoria de berry pero desconozco equivalente (rosa mosqueta, zarzaparrilla, murta, maqui, calafate). Y otros que no tiene equivalente encastellano (goldenberry).

    Solo un dato anecdótico: Según dicen, la primera strawberry fue descubierta en Chile...
     

    mrbotany

    New Member
    english
    All of these fruits are different, but related, species. In fact, there are a number of different species of blueberry and cranberry, and they are used differently in cooking. But of course, because they are not native to most spanish speaking countries, it makes sense that there are not different words for each one, like there is in the States.
    Happy eating!
    berry
    ╚loganberry
    ╚dewberry
    ╚boysenberry
    ╚blackberry
    ╚currant
    ╚lingonberry; mountain cranberry; cowberry; lowbush cranberry
    ╚cranberry
    ╚wintergreen; boxberry; checkerberry; teaberry; spiceberry
    ╚blueberry
    ╚huckleberry
    ╚bilberry; whortleberry; European blueberry
     

    Mate

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    Blackberry: mora (la que crece en los árboles). No es una verdadera baya desde el punto de vista botánico.

    Blueberry: muy cultivado en el país para exportación. Le decimos arándano.

    Cranberry: en wikipedia figura como "arándano rojo".
     

    Aviador

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Chile
    Blackberry: mora (la que crece en los árboles). No es una verdadera baya desde el punto de vista botánico. [...]
    Mate, la fruta llamada en inglés blackberry, Rubus fruticosus (zarzamora) no crece en árboles sino en arbustos. Una fruta de aspecto similar que crece en árboles (moreras) es lo que se llama en inglés mulberry, Morus nigra (mora).

    Saludos.
     
    Last edited:

    Filimer

    Senior Member
    Español
    Un detalle: los nombres científicos además de ir en cursiva siempre tienen la primera letra en mayúscula (y ninguna otra). Rubus fruticosus y Morus nigra
     

    Mate

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    Mate, la fruta llamada en inglés blackberry, Rubus fruticosus (zarzamora) no crece en árboles sino en arbustos. Una fruta de aspecto similar que crece en árboles (moreras) es lo que se llama en inglés mulberry, Morus nigra (mora).

    Saludos.
    Un detalle: los nombres científicos además de ir en cursiva siempre tienen la primera letra en mayúscula (y ninguna otra). Rubus fruticosus y Morus nigra
    Tienen razón los dos. :thumbsup:
     

    vicdark

    Senior Member
    Español, Bolivia
    No dudo ni discuto que las berries se conozcan como "bayas" en muchas partes. Sin embargo, desde el punto de vista técnico (agronómico y botánico) eso no es correcto, pues las bayas son un tipo muy general de frutos, como puede verse en éste sitio.

    El nombre general de las berries es moras, de las cuales existen las numerosas especies que otros han mencionado en este hilo.

    Just my 2 centavos.
     

    Yoru_no

    Member
    Español (México)
    Here in Mexico we use zarzamora for blackberry, arándano for cranberry and mora azul for blueberry. In many products you will find those terms, at least in Mexico city and surrounding areas.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top