Blackmail - compound noun

  • Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    If you would like to know if an adjective-noun combination can be called a compound noun, the answer is yes although other combinations are possible: farmhouse, farmland, etc. "Yes," blackmail is a compound noun. :)

    compound
    "A compound consists of two or more words that come together to express a single concept"

    "(A compound) may be a noun, verb, or an adjective. Some compounds are written as two separate words, (open compounds), some run the words together (closed compounds), and some link them by a hyphen (hyphenated compounds). There are no strict rules governing this." (Grammatically Correct)
     
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    Mellman

    New Member
    spanish
    Thanks! Exactly, I don't know if words like that should always be considered as compound nouns, or if there are other examples that are considered as only one word. I had the same doubt with the word "lunchtime'...
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    Exactly, I don't know if words like that should always be considered as compound nouns, or if there are other examples that are considered as only one word. I had the same doubt with the word "lunchtime'...
    I think I understand your "issue". (It would be helpful to know the incentive for asking.)
     

    Mellman

    New Member
    spanish
    I'm dealing with an exercise concerning intonation and stressing.
    I was told that the rule for compound nouns is that the stress falls on the first element as in baby sitter.
    I have the sentence It's lunchtime here... so I should say it's lunchtime instead of lunchtime
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    I was told that the rule for compound nouns is that the stress falls on the first element as in baby sitter.
    I have the sentence It's lunchtime here... so I should say it's lunchtime instead of lunchtime
    I believe most of the compounds (adjectives, nouns, and verbs) do have stress on the first element: clear-cut, light show, fire-eater, spotlight, and touch-type.
     
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    Forero

    Senior Member
    I use one intonation pattern for "blackmail", "lunchtime", "baby sitter", "light show", "fire eater", and "spotlight" (extra stress on the first element) and quite a different one for "clear-cut" and "touch-type" (about equal stress on the two elements). At the end of a phrase, "clear cut" and "touch type" have final stress on the last element, but the others don't.
     
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