Blame by praise

Annalisa

New Member
Italy
What is the blame-by-praise figure? It concerns Aristotele's philosophy but I can't find a translation!
Thanks a lot!
Annalisa
 
  • Annalisa

    New Member
    Italy
    What is the blame-by-praise figure? It concerns Aristotele's philosophy but I can't find a translation!
    Thanks a lot!
    Annalisa

    :)
     

    Annalisa

    New Member
    Italy
    It's not 'damning with faint praise', I've already tried in Google, I just found an Italian article but the authors call this figure just 'blame-by-praise' or 'praise-by-blame' in English, but they don't translate it. I need to understand what does it mean, not only the translation. It's for my thesis,

    Thanks a lot!:)
     

    Panpan

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I think the word you want is 'irony' (Engl) /ironia (It) (from Greek 'eiron'). ?? First mentioned by Aristophanes (possibly, don't quote me please).

    I.e. using inflexion in the voice to imply the opposite meaning of what is said.

    Hope that helps

    Panpan
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Annalisa: I think we are really struggling here, although keen to help if we can. When I Googled those words I got out of my depth very quickly.
    I think you need comment from someone who understands Aristotelian philosophy, and perhaps has a small understanding of Italian - although it looks like you would not have any problem with an answer in English.
    Is there philosophy forum you could try?
    Alternatively, could you ask one or two REALLY SIMPLE questions for us really simple people to try to help:)
     

    Benino

    New Member
    United States
    Ciao Annalisa,

    I think you can solve your problem by reading Antony's funeral oration after the assassination of Julius Caesar in Shakespeare's play (III.ii).

    You can get an Italian version online by searching for: shakespeare "giulio cesare"

    Anyway, Antony wants to make the crowd hate Brutus, but instead of attacking Brutus, he keeps repeating sarcastic phrases like "Bruto è certamente uom d'onore". He relies on his audience to contradict him, and it's actually a great rhetorical device for making people believe what you want while letting them think that they're disagreeing with you.
     

    Annalisa

    New Member
    Italy
    At first thanks a lot to all of you! I'm sorry Panjandrum, I would prefer to aks simple questions too. I'va already read 'Giulio Cesare' and I have a copy in English, if this is the blame-by-praise figure I have understood. However, I don't think that it fits translating it with the Italian word 'ironia'. I'm translating a book about the strategies for translating ironic utterances, blame-by-praise is a type of irony. How would you translate it literaly?
    THANKS!
     

    Benino

    New Member
    United States
    Well, then, I guess I have to agree with Panpan, and go for "ironia sarcastica".

    Or if you want a really heavy literal translation, what about "incolpare attraverso un complimento"?
     

    Annalisa

    New Member
    Italy
    Thanks Benino,
    I needed the literal translation just to write it in the N.d.T. (+ the explaination of the figure). I think it's better to leave this expression in English in my translation because it's more effective than in Italian. I found also some articles about blame-by-praise written by Italian Linguists and they have left the English terms. What do you think?
    Thanks a lot! :):):)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Annalisa:
    If this term "blame-by-praise" is well known in philosophy, then unless there is an equally well-known Italian equivalent, and it seems that there isn't, then it would be OK to use the English term. Use whatever is normal for you to mark it as "foreign" - italics, "", or whatever.
     
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