blanket-stitched

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
A man, looking at a toy cowboy:
-- Original hand-painted face. Natural-dyed, blanket-stitched vest! Hmm. A little rip. Fixable. Oh, if only you had your hand-stitched, polyvinyl hat!
Toy Story 2, animation

Explain please blanket-stitched, esp. blanket. Thanks.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It was a comment about knowing how to search the dictionary - and not also searching for the two words separately (without the hyphen). The search function only looks for *exactly* what you enter.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's an idiom that is impenetrable to non-native speakers:D The explanation I gave is the best way to explain it - it relies on context and logic. If I walked into someone's apartment and saw a huge number of empty chocolate bar wrappers (making it clear that they eat a lot of chocolate) I might say "Chocolate much?" More commonly, probably, it uses a verb, but it is not needed if the context makes it clear:)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think perhaps you are having problems with the idea of context, rather than meaning/structure:(

    You walk into the garage of a friend and see several race cars, some in pieces, and much evidence of participation in car-racing, so you ask "Race much?"

    (PS it does not folloow the "rules" of grammar, so perhaps that's the problem:D)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I think perhaps you are having problems with the idea of context, rather than meaning/structure:(
    It's vice-versa. I understand that if I see that someone has used a lot of X, then I say "X much?". But I don't understand the structure. Looks like it's kind of ellipsis, right? ...
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's not really susceptible to grammatical analysis - the two words are all that's necessary. If they get the meaning across, then that's all you need. However, feel free to try and turn it into something you find grammatically acceptable by adding words:D Usually "Do you" at the beginning is omitted but the actual meaning is "It seems as though you race a lot, maybe too much?" or it can be used sarcastically etc.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's not an idiom I'm very familiar with, but I get it. With the racing car example, it's like saying '(Do you) race much?' It's stating the obvious - which we like to do sometimes.

    With the 'chocolate' example, it's the same principle, but making 'chocolate' a verb - 'to chocolate'.

    Crossed with an expert on this idiom. :)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    So it functions as a verb. I suspected it might be that. Julian, why didn't you say it from the beginning?:D

    Thanks for the replies!
     
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