Blast off vs. Take off (figurative)

miguelángělus

New Member
Spanish - Perú
Hi All,

Can I use "to blast off" the same way as "to take off"?

I'm not referring to rockets but the figurative meaning of "taking off". For instance, when you are working on a project for a while and then it starts working, you can say "it finally took off". You can also say, "our experts will help you take off your project".

So, imagine this is an advertising for a course that will help you to take off your project, can I just say: "Take off your project!"?

On that same sense, can I say "Blast off your project!"?

Cheers,

Miguel
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    We might say "it finally took off", but we don't say "our experts will help you take off your project". But we could say "our experts will help your project take off."

    can I just say: "Take off your project!"?
    No. This would sound like you were wearing a project, and were taking it off - like wearing a coat, and taking it off. :)

    On that same sense, can I say "Blast off your project!"?
    No.

    'Blast off' doesn't work as a synonym for 'take off' in this context
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Mission control launches the rocket. The rocket blasts off.
    Similarly, the airplane takes off. The pilot doesn't "take off" the airplane.
     

    miguelángělus

    New Member
    Spanish - Perú
    Ok, heypresto, thanks a lot.

    I just liked the way "blast" sounds and wanted it in the title (and it rhymes with "podcast"). I have to think of something else, I guess.

    Cheers,

    Miguel
     
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