blaze going

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
He put on more firewood to get a good blaze going.
I litthe fire and soon had a cheerful blaze going.

(examples from dictionaries)

I'm not sure about the meaning of 'going' here.
It's a participle, right?
That is, one can say "a blaze goes"?
Thanks.
 
  • MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    to get (something/someone) going
    ...is an idiom. Idioms are a group of words having an established usage and meaning. The meaning of the idiom cannot be understood from the meaning of each of the individual words. Hence, we cannot determine what actual part of speech in the idiom that 'going' is, or serves.
    My car broke down, but the AA roadside service was able to get my car going again.

    In your second sentence, 'going' is an adjective, and is similar to:
    I asked the foreman if he had any jobs going.

    (So whether 'going' in the first sentence is also an adjective..........I don't know. Someone more knowledgeable on such matters may be able to enlighten us both.)
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thanks for the answers.
    But it's interesting.
    I was almost 100% sure that 'going' in 'get/have something going' is a participle.
    Because if it's a gerund, then the word denoted by something acts as an adjective modifying the gerund, which seems unlikely to me.
    Does that make sense?
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    "going" is often used with regard to how well a fire is burning,
    eg
    I tried to get the fire going. ( = to burn well, to be self-sustaining )
    I couldn't get the fire going because the wood was too damp.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    So, as I understand, both goings in #1 are rather adjectives (or participles, which is not a matter of principle).
    Thank you.
     
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