blazing trails

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Please could you help me with that phrase in the following context:
"The Dunlop deal could blaze a trail."

Thank you!

I already know the single words (to blaze is as similar as to glow and a trail something similar as a road), but put together they make no sense for me.
 
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  • Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    The phrase "blaze a trail" in English means to start a road which can later be used by you or others.

    The image is of going into a woods full of trees, brush etc. There are no trails, and you create one by cutting away at the vegetation. I suspect that before mechanical machinery this was sometimes done with fire, hence the use of the word blaze.
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    To 'blaze a trail' also means to cut a path or trail through a forest, mark the trees with little cuts at around eye level (to blaze). So, 'to blaze a trail' means to be a pioneer or to go where others have not ventured.
     
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    The phrase "blaze a trail" in English means to start a road which can later be used by you or others.

    The image is of going into a woods full of trees, brush etc. There are no trails, and you create one by cutting away at the vegetation. I suspect that before mechanical machinery this was sometimes done with fire, hence the use of the word blaze.
    thank you.
    I thought of that possibility but the imagination of making fire just to have a path was a little bit odd for me.
     
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