Blend into the scenery

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Leander43

Member
Portuguese
Hello, everybody!
Alert: this thread is a little disgusting.

Some days ago, someone dropped a plastic bag with some trash in it, and before I had a chance to pick it up, so many cars had run over it that it became a solid substance that glued to the ground and became almost impossible to remove.
Is that a literal case of something that blended into the scenery or is it used only in a figurative way?
I also ask you to please correct my mistakes here or give me suggestions to make my narrative sound more natural.
Thank you!
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What are you describing as “blending into the scenery”, and where? That phrase is not even used in your sentence – nor is it a concept one would naturally associate with the situation described.
     

    Leander43

    Member
    Portuguese
    What are you describing as “blending into the scenery”, and where? That phrase is not even used in your sentence – nor is it a concept one would naturally associate with the situation described.
    I mean, the plastic bag with the trash after so many cars ran over it, blended into the scenery, becoming part of the ground as if it was the ground itself.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Metaphorically the garbage could be said to be "welded" or "glued" to the roadway, or "steamrolled" to the roadway.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Note that in British English that past participle would be steamrollered. But steamrollering is usually used figuratively, in the sense of pressuring/pressurising someone into doing something they’re reluctant to do.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Blended into the scenery would not be used in that context. It refers to something more figurative or to a trick of the eye where the thing was hidden by accidental camouflage.
     
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