Blend/Mix the eggs and the flour together

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GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
This is not just a question about cooking, but also about the usage of the two verbs. Is there an difference between "Blend the eggs and the flower together" and "Mix the eggs and the flour together"? I usually use "mix" without thinking too much about it, but they are probably different.

What do you think?



Thank you all :)
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Do you hope the person following the instructions will use a mixer or a blender? I think you should stick with "mix" so that no one gets the wrong idea.
    Ignoring that problem, blending puts more emphasis on combining two things into one thing. Two things that are mixed might be intermingled - a bowl of mixed berries would still be whole blueberries, strawberries, etc, while a bowl of blended berries would probably be pureed.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Many people these days reserve the use of "blend" in such situations to refer to something done in a blender (liquidiser). There was extensive discussion of blender vs. mixer here. Mix sounds fine but may not be specific enough - for example I usually see "beat" eggs into flour.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    That's a good point, Myridon. If we wanted to make some pancake batter, wouldn't we add eggs, milk and flour and them mix them together? In this case I might use a whisk, not a mixer.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Oh...it sounds just fine. Can't we also mix the eggs and the flour? I presume it sounds odd, or at least it sounds odd to me. Can't we "whisk them together" if we are using a whisk? I will not delete the "mix" sentence. Someone else might learn from my pathetic mistake. We hardly ever mix eggs and flour. When we make cakes, we usually "mix them together" with a mixer or if we don't have one, we whisk them together.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    That's a good point, Myridon. If we wanted to make some pancake batter, wouldn't we add eggs, milk and flour and them mix them together? In this case I might use a whisk, not a mixer.
    If you particularly want a whisk to be used, say "Whisk the ingredients." If you want them to use a spoon, "Stir the ingredients." If you don't want a mixer to be used, "Using a spoon or whisk, mix the ingredients."

    To Julian's post: I beat eggs by themselves and then mix the beaten eggs with the flour. You can't beat flour so I would not say "beat eggs and flour".
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    If you particularly want a whisk to be used, say "Whisk the ingredients." If you want them to use a spoon, "Stir the ingredients." If you don't want a mixer to be used, "Using a spoon or whisk, mix the ingredients."

    To Julian's post: I beat eggs by themselves and then mix the beaten eggs with the flour. You can't beat flour so I would not say "beat eggs and flour".
    Thank you, Myridon. Can we whisk flour, eggs and milk together? I think we can, but can we say "whisk together"? Is it proper English? That's what I do when I make pancakes. If I didn't want them to use a mixer, I would probably say "Use a spoon to mix the ingredients". That's just a personal preference, so it doesn't count :).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yes.
    Whisk the flour, eggs, and milk.
    Whisk the flour, eggs, and milk together.
    Whisk together the flour, eggs, and milk.
    The third option does seem more informal or lower register to me, but then cooking is often a very informal activity. ;) Cook books are not scientific journals. :)
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    One last question. Some people don't have whisks (mine is broken :() and they use forks instead. Would it be okay to say "Whisk the flour, eggs and milk with a fork"? I know it probably sounds weird to you, but people do it here :D. Well, I think that it is a rather informal activity in most cases. I think we can use spoons, whisks, forks for another purposes too, but we just have to be specific. "Stir the soup with the meat cleaver", hehe.

    Please excuse me for the annoying questions regarding the subject of cooking :(
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Whisking is a particular type of stirring which can be done with a fork as the tines of the fork can still do the whipping, incorporating of air action. You probably couldn't successfully whisk with a pencil even though you could stir with a pencil.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Thank you for your help, Myridon :). I appreciate it. I am familiar with mixing and blending styles/etc. Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary says: "Their music blends traditional and modern styles" and the sentence on MacMillan is pretty much the same, but "Their music mixes...." is used. They are the same to me, but since I am not a native speaker, I had better shut my mouth.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    As I said in post #2, the difference (when there is a difference) of emphasis or degree. For some ingredients, the result of mixing and blending will be the same or almost the same. For some ingredients, the results may be quite different.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Many people these days reserve the use of "blend" in such situations to refer to something done in a blender (liquidiser). There was extensive discussion of blender vs. mixer here. Mix sounds fine but may not be specific enough - for example I usually see "beat" eggs into flour.
    Oh...it sounds just fine. Can't we also mix the eggs and the flour? I presume it sounds odd, or at least it sounds odd to me. Can't we "whisk them together" if we are using a whisk? I will not delete the "mix" sentence. Someone else might learn from my pathetic mistake. We hardly ever mix eggs and flour. When we make cakes, we usually "mix them together" with a mixer or if we don't have one, we whisk them together.
    My post was intended to mean that "mix" is fairly generic (and therefore usable) while the other terms are more specific about how the mixing occurs and that some recipes require a specific process to be used. That link explores a lot of the blend/mix meaning space:D
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It seems that to blend is a more precise term than to mix:

    http://www.d.umn.edu/~alphanu/cookery/glossary_cooking.htmlBLEND:
    To incorporate two or more ingredients thoroughly.

    http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/wayne/nutrition/CookingTerms/B.html#Blend
    To combine two or more ingredients until smooth and uniform in texture, flavor, and color; may be done by hand or with an electric blender or mixer.

    For example, we could not "blend" currants, raisins, nuts into a mixture, but we could mix then into the mixture.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It seems that to blend is a more precise term than to mix:

    http://www.d.umn.edu/~alphanu/cookery/glossary_cooking.htmlBLEND:
    To incorporate two or more ingredients thoroughly.

    http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/wayne/nutrition/CookingTerms/B.html#Blend
    To combine two or more ingredients until smooth and uniform in texture, flavor, and color; may be done by hand or with an electric blender or mixer.

    For example, we could not "blend" currants, raisins, nuts into a mixture, but we could mix then into the mixture.
    If you put them in a blender for long enough, you could eventually get something uniform in texture, flavour and colour - perhaps making a smooth spread of some sort . However, that operation would not be considered by someone who read "mix in the currants ..." when making a fruit cake.

    Blend now seems to have two meanings : 1) put in a blender and operate it somehow 2) mix two or more items uniformly (think blending of wines or whiskeys).
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Thank you all. At the risk of being misunderstood, I will say that it might be difficult to blend two or more things together by hand. I agree with Paul that a blended mixture is uniform and smooth. When we mix two or more things together, the mixture can be smooth too, depending on a lot of things of course. We are probably splitting hair. I agree that we can't blend raisins and grapes, but we can mix them (together).

    I hope we are still friends and nobody wants to execute me
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    As I said in post #2, the difference (when there is a difference) of emphasis or degree. For some ingredients, the result of mixing and blending will be the same or almost the same. For some ingredients, the results may be quite different.
    Of course, Myridon. In this context they look similar, if not the same to me, but that's probably because I am ignorant.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Of course, Myridon. In this context they look similar, if not the same to me, but that's probably because I am ignorant.
    You're right - a mixture of eggs and flour and a blend of eggs and flour are very similar particularly if the mixture is mixed very well.
    A mixture of strawberries and blueberries is some red fruit and some blue fruit in a random arrangement. A blend of strawberries and blueberries is a smoothie (a purple drink).
     
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