Blend or what?

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Riyan

Senior Member
Pashto
Is there any word to describe a blend (not actually a blend) of two words?
For example: I've made two words out of 4 and I wonder if there's a single word to describe it...
Apple Slices + Sparkly Eyes = Apple Eyes.
A blend is a single word, as brunch (breakfast + lunch). What would be a word for describing a blend of two words?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You might as well use blend, but don't expect all your listeners to understand what you are talking about. Even though an applicable definition is offered in the WR dictionary, a lot of people won't be familiar with that definition. You will probably have to explain what blend means in your references to names that you make up.
     

    Riyan

    Senior Member
    Pashto
    You might as well use blend, but don't expect all your listeners to understand what you are talking about. Even though an applicable definition is offered in the WR dictionary, a lot of people won't be familiar with that definition. You will probably have to explain what blend means in your references to names that you make up.
    Thank you, Owlman5. :)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Apple Slices + Sparkly Eyes = Apple Eyes.
    I doubt that anyone would understand Apple Eyes as being the shape of apple slices and sparkly. The phrase has no information on slices or sparkly. As such, it is not a "blend".

    Apple eyes = noun1 + noun2 = noun2 associated with noun1 = eyes associated (in some way) with apples.
     

    Riyan

    Senior Member
    Pashto
    I doubt that anyone would understand Apple Eyes as being the shape of apple slices and sparkly. The phrase has no information on slices or sparkly. As such, it is not a "blend".

    Apple eyes = noun1 + noun2 = noun2 associated with noun1 = eyes associated (in some way) with apples.
    Oh. You're correct. It has no information on slices or sparkly. :p

    Thank you, PaulQ. :)
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    If you make up a new word it is a neologism.

    If you use a word or phrase wrongly you can call it a malapropism, especially if the results are amusing.

    As far as putting two random words together, that is just writing and being creative. If the phrase communicated something to your audience your writing is successful and if they get the wrong idea, then you need to try again.

    If you want to evaluate the effectiveness of your new phrase then you need to consider if it would make sense to someone who heard it with no explanation.
     

    Riyan

    Senior Member
    Pashto
    If you make up a new word it is a neologism.

    If you use a word or phrase wrongly you can call it a malapropism, especially if the results are amusing.

    As far as putting two random words together, that is just writing and being creative. If the phrase communicated something to your audience your writing is successful and if they get the wrong idea, then you need to try again.

    If you want to evaluate the effectiveness of your new phrase then you need to consider if it would make sense to someone who heard it with no explanation.
    Thank you, Ponyprof. :)
     
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