block vs. tackle [football]

Muhammad Khatab

Senior Member
Classical Arabic
He made a good block during the football match, but unfortunately he caused severe physical problems for the opponent.
Does" block" have the same meaning as "tackle"?
Thanks in advance!!:)
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You have not told us if you mean American football, or the football that the rest of the world plays. Can you help?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It seems a very strange sentence.

    A block usually happens when the other team shoots and a defender stops the ball from going towards his goal. We don't usually speak of "making a block" - we use the verb - "he blocked the ball well." It is also strange that a block could injure anyone.

    "unfortunately, he caused severe physical problems for the opponent." is also strange as we would expect "unfortunately, he badly injured the forward of the other team." or "unfortunately, he badly injured <insert the name of the player>."

    It is possible that the speaker meant "He obstructed <insert the name of a player from the other team> during the football match." but obstructing someone can never be described as "good".

    Where did you find this sentence?
     

    Muhammad Khatab

    Senior Member
    Classical Arabic
    It seems a very strange sentence.

    A block usually happens when the other team shoots and a defender stops the ball from going towards his goal. We don't usually speak of "making a block" - we use the verb - "he blocked the ball well." It is also strange that a block could injure anyone.

    "unfortunately, he caused severe physical problems for the opponent." is also strange as we would expect "unfortunately, he badly injured the forward of the other team." or "unfortunately, he badly injured <insert the name of the player>."

    It is possible that the speaker meant "He obstructed <insert the name of a player from the other team> during the football match." but obstructing someone can never be described as "good".

    Where did you find this sentence?
    Actually, my teacher told me this sentence, but it was odd to me, so I had to ask about it.
    In fact, the teacher defined the word "block" as: " a movement that stops another player from going forward; or a movement that stops the opponent's attack. And as shown by his definition, I think the verb "make" is appropriate.
     
    Last edited:

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In US football -

    - "block" and "tackle" are both things that happen very often (though they are different things).
    - "block" is define exactly the way your teacher describes it.
    - we often say "he made a good block"
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I'm talking about the football that the rest of the world plays.
    In view of this:
    In fact, the teacher defined the word "block" as: " a movement that stops another player from going forward; or a movement that stops the opponent's attack.
    and this
    In US football -

    - "block" and "tackle" are both things that happen very often
    I do not think that your teacher was talking about football (soccer) but American football:
     

    Muhammad Khatab

    Senior Member
    Classical Arabic
    In US football -

    - "block" and "tackle" are both things that happen very often (though they are different things).
    - "block" is define exactly the way your teacher describes it.
    - we often say "he made a good block"
    You mean that every "block" is considered a "tackle", and not vice versa? That's to say, "block" can express any form of movement that's used to halt a player from going forward, while "tackle" express only the act of sliding on the pitch taking the ball.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    In American football you can block any player (impede their motion) whether they have the ball or not. You can only tackle someone who has the ball and you bring them to the ground (like a Rugby tackle). Tackle in soccer means to take the ball away from the opponent and often, but not always, gain control yourself.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You mean that "block" is a term used in "American football," while "tackle" is a term used in "soccer"?
    No.
    Both words are used in both sports, but in each sport, they mean different things. Julian has explained above and I have explained "block" in soccer in #4.
     
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