blossom fully, proudly and beautifully

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether the underlined part is idiomatic:

"The flower blossoms fully, proudly and beautifully."

Thoughts: There is a flower blossoming in winter when all other plants cannot grow. By saying this I want to emphasize it tenacity and beauty.
 
  • dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    It doesn't capture the plant's tenacity which seems to be an important part of the message. I'd substitute tenaciously for proudly.

    "The flower blossoms fully, tenaciously and beautifully."
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It doesn't capture the plant's tenacity which seems to be an important part of the message. I'd substitute tenaciously for proudly.

    "The flower blossoms fully, tenaciously and beautifully."
    I use proudly because it is among the fewer flowers that can blossom in winter which makes it outstanding and appears to be proud of itself.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "The flower blossoms fully, proudly and beautifully."
    To me, this seems to be a direct translation from the Chinese and, as such is not idiomatic at all. It sound like something from an official publication - it is over-effusive - particularly the words "fully" and "proudly". English does not (other than in 200 year old poetry) use such phrasing.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If this is about the wintersweet in the other thread, Sun, it doesn't have blossoms that thrust upwards - so "proud" for me would not be a good adjective to describe it.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think "elegant" fittingly describes that plant.

    By the way, "the plant blossoms". A flower and a blossom are synonyms, so to say that "the flower blossoms" is superfluous.

    "Fully" - profusely, perhaps.
     
    Last edited:

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I think "elegant" fittingly describes that plant.

    By the way, "the plant blossoms". A flower and a blossom are synonyms, so to say that "the flower blossoms" is superfluous.

    "Fully" - profusely, perhaps.
    In the OP, I tried to use blossom as a verb.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    That's fine as a verb, but be aware that "a flower" = "a blossom" so a flower can't blossom, in your sense of "produce flowers".:) A flower that blossoms is flower that opens fully: a rosebud blossoms into a full-blown rose.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    That's fine as a verb, but be aware that "a flower" = "a blossom" so a flower can't blossom, in your sense of "produce flowers".:) A flower that blossoms is flower that opens fully: a rosebud blossoms into a full-blown rose.
    Got it. Thank you so much.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "The flower blooms" sounds fine to me. Honestly, "The flower blossoms" sounded fine to me as well. I'm not sure most speakers approach this with the same precision that Veli described.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I just re-read Veli's posts more carefully and I actually agree with her. You can't say "blossoms" if you mean "produces blossoms," but you can use either "bloom" or "blossom" if you're talking about a flower opening fully.

    I assumed you meant the latter. In that case, either verb works.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I just re-read Veli's posts more carefully and I actually agree with her. You can't say "blossoms" if you mean "produces blossoms," but you can use either "bloom" or "blossom" if you're talking about a flower opening fully.

    I assumed you meant the latter. In that case, either verb works.
    Vel doesn't suggest using it as a verb. You just said you agreed with her. Why do you still suggest using them as verbs.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    That's fine as a verb, but be aware that "a flower" = "a blossom" so a flower can't blossom, in your sense of "produce flowers".:) A flower that blossoms is flower that opens fully: a rosebud blossoms into a full-blown rose.
    This is a verbal usage.
     
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