Blue collar actors

LuaIzzie

New Member
Italiano - Italia
Hi, everyone.
Nel documentario a cui sto lavorando ci sono due concorrenti che nella vita fanno gli attori di teatro di basso livello. Nel contesto in questione loro si definiscono "Blue collars actors" quando pensano di essere gli ultimi in classifica. In rete ho trovato che originariamente il termine blu collar era usato per descrivere chi svolgeva lavori umili, come gli operai delle fabbriche, e che oggi si usa per definire una persona comune, semplice. Io l'ho tradotto con "attori di teatro". Forse però è troppo generico?
Grazie.
 
  • ginestre

    Senior Member
    Mmmh...not sure either will fly. :oops:
    Both adjectives describe their busyness, but little more. From the OP's description, I get the sense we're dealing with entry-level actors.
    I don't get any sense of entry-level from blue collar: the latter is a standard description of manual/factory workers, as against white collar, or office workers. There is no sense that one could progress from entry level to higher level. I quite like attori di fatica, I must say: it's as unusual as blue collar actors.
     

    ginestre

    Senior Member
    If you read my post, you will find that I got that sense not from the words "blue collar" but from the OP's description. Have you read it? ;)
    Yes, actually. And I still don't get any sense of progress from blue collar. The OP says they are the 'ultimi in classifica'. 'Entry level' can be either a simplified (software) system for those users who have minimal requirements, or the lowest position on a career path which is destined to go upwards. 'Ble collar' on the other hand is a different category from its opposite, white collar' - and the subtext is usually that they shall never meet.
     

    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    ginestre said:
    And I still don't get any sense of progress from blue collar. The OP says they are the 'ultimi in classifica'.
    They describe themselves as "blue collar" actors and they are at the lowest rung of an acting career. To me, that's entry-level.

    If the association of blue collar and lowest rung/entry level grates on you, perhaps you should ask for further clarification from the OP.
     
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    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    Thanks you all for all your suggestions. You are being very helpful.
    Whoa, not so fast Lualzzie. :) Inquiring minds want to know more.
    • Can you describe what these guys do in more detail?
    • You mentioned they're "concorrenti". Is this a TV show they're taking part in?
     

    LuaIzzie

    New Member
    Italiano - Italia
    Whoa, not so fast Lualzzie. :) Inquiring minds want to know more.
    • Can you describe what these guys do in more detail?
    • You mentioned they're "concorrenti". Is this a TV show they're taking part in?
    They only say that they usuallt do comedy plays for a living, nothing more.
    Yes, it's a TV competition. That's all I know.
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Be', il fatto che siano 'attori di teatro di basso livello' e 'do comedy plays' mi evoca istintivamente la definizione tutta italiana 'attori d'avanspettacolo', o al massimo 'di varietà'. :)
     

    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi, everyone.
    Nel documentario a cui sto lavorando ci sono due concorrenti che nella vita fanno gli attori di teatro di basso livello. Nel contesto in questione loro si definiscono "Blue collars actors" quando pensano di essere gli ultimi in classifica.
    Come si descrivono? Cosa dicono esattamente? Una frase completa, almeno.

    Edit:
    Intanto, questa definizione potrebbe essere utile:

    2:
    having characteristics associated with blue-collar workers:
    as
    a: having, showing, or appealing to unpretentious or unsophisticated tastes <a new blue–collar serial …
    woven around a minor-league baseball team — Steven Flax>
    b: dependable and hard-working rather than showy or spectacular <a blue–collar athlete>
    Definition of BLUE–COLLAR
     
    Last edited:
    There is often an element of pride in "blue collar" (the work ethic, dependability, etc, as mentioned in the definition provided by Tellure).
    "Blue-collar" is a term rich in meaning.
    "Blue-collar actors" significa per me attori solidi e fidati che lavorano duro, ma che non sono le star famose, le celebrità destinate a finire sulle prime pagine delle riviste.
    Perhaps that is why the Italian author of a book on cybernetics chose not to translate it but to use "bluecollar" in inverted commas to describe his approach to his work.

    Edit: I have come across the expression "attore-operaio". Is that relevant?
     
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    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    I think you're onto something, John.
    I earlier suggested "attori di fatica"—a newly coined expression, because I had never heard of "attore operaio". But this seems to fill the bill just fine.

    From what I could gather, these two gents are the "troops" in a theater company. Maybe they have speaking parts, maybe they don't. They are not star material but they consider this their job.
    Putting it in context, the OP says they're contestants in a TV show. They're interviewed and briefly describe themselves as "blue collar" actors, regular people who act in plays for a living.
    And that's it. They presumably move on and take part in this TV show (reality, quiz? Who knows?)
     
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