blue-white milk

Em Em

Member
Bahasa Indonesia
Hi there,


I am reading The Story Sister (Alice Hoffman). I am confuse by the sentence:
"They loved French ice cream and the glasses of blue-white milk."

Are these "glasses of blue white milk":
1. milk glasses in blue-white color?
2. some kind of milk?

Thanks guys.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I assume that "blue-white milk" refers to the color of the milk itself. Milk, especially skim milk, can have a sort of bluish tint. Rural relatives of mine used the word "bluejohn" to talk about skim milk that contained very little cream or fat.
     

    Em Em

    Member
    Bahasa Indonesia
    Thank you Owlman5. That's very helpful.

    So from the sentence, did they love "the glasses of the milk," "the taste," or "the color of the milk?"

    Thank you in advance.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome. Hoffman seems to be telling us that they loved ice-cream and milk. I don't think they had any special love for the glasses that the milk was served in or the color of the milk, but I could be wrong.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    This is sheer speculation, but there may be some quaint irony in the fact that they are eating rich and fattening ice cream while drinking the kind of milk that is intended for dieters.
     

    Em Em

    Member
    Bahasa Indonesia
    Thank you for the answers.

    Hey, that's right. It's ironic and odd, loving ice cream and skim milk at the same time, :)
     

    Em Em

    Member
    Bahasa Indonesia
    Hi RM1(SS),

    The sentence "glasses of blue-white milk" is a direct quote from the book. That was what Hoffman write and made me confuse :)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I gather from reading about the book that these are American girls in Paris, doing that extraordinarily American thing, drinking glasses of milk. This milk drinking by the glassful is by and large unknown in Europe, but the French traditionally drink very little at all.
    Just think: if you don't have it in coffee, except maybe for breakfast, don't eat breakfast cereal, don't drink tea and don't make puddings and sauces, or your own icecream, you won't buy fresh milk or get through much milk at all.
    My theory is that the girls were drinking UHT milk, that's been ultra-heat treated so it can be kept without refrigeration, until it's opened.

    "According to The Times of London, in 2007, UHT milk accounted for 96.7 percent of total milk consumption in Belgium, 95.5 percent of the milk drunk in France, and 95.7 percent of the milk consumed in Spain. Its popularity varies widely across Europe; it accounts for just one percent of milk sales in Greece, 2.4 percent in Finland, and 8.4 percent in Britain."

    This milk might indeed also be skimmed. If you're extremely careful and very fussy about the quality of what you eat you might well decide to dispense with unnecessary fat. By the way skimmed milk is not only for slimmers.
    With the golden fat globules removed milk does look more blue.

    I keep UHT milk for emergencies, such as getting snowed in or being unable to get to the shop and it's skimmed like the fresh milk we use everyday, in tea and coffee. It always looks sort of thin as I pour it but maybe I imagine that because i thin k it's inferior. It certainly tastes different.

    Anyway, I'm going to ask Alice Hoffman!
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    The sentence "glasses of blue-white milk" is a direct quote from the book. That was what Hoffman write and made me confuse :)
    The adjective goes with the following noun.

    Glasses of blue-white milk - The milk is blue-white.
    Blue-white glasses of milk - The glasses are blue-white.
     

    Uriel-

    Senior Member
    American English
    Bluish milk is skim milk.

    I had UHT milk (from New Zealand) while I lived in Japan. Real milk was hard to come by there, since they aren't big on dairy, so it was either that or this sickly concoction of milk mixed with coconut oil (just awful). The UHT milk was actually thick and creamy and not thin or blue at all, and quite delicious.
     

    Em Em

    Member
    Bahasa Indonesia
    The adjective goes with the following noun.

    Glasses of blue-white milk - The milk is blue-white.
    Blue-white glasses of milk - The glasses are blue-white.

    Thank you. Adjective + noun. I have to keep that in mind. I don't know, but grammar is a nightmare to me. I have learnt English for more than 10 years with slow progress. Until I read somewhere that I should stop thinking the grammar and start listening. I did it, and my English progress was much more faster in a brief moment. The thing is, the moment when I do interested in learning English passes already, stolen by years of grammar learning that really made me sick. I blame my government for the curriculum and I blame my favorite English teacher in high school, who left me for new career after wonderful three months English classes :p. But I am working on it. I am struggle here.

    And hey, I like this forum. People are nice and patiently response to me. Thank you very much.

    By the way, we here have UHT milk too. There's a low fat one that I sometimes buy. Yes, not really delicious, but kinda creamy, not thin or blue too.
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    The question is if it's the milk itself that's blue-white, or if it's milk coming in a blue-white package? In Sweden we often speak about blue, green or red milk, there's nothing wrong with the colour of the milk, it's the packages that are blue, green or red, depending on if it's skimmed, semi-skimmed or full milk. There seems to be a brand of milk in France named Lait bleu-blanc, could it be this brand the girls like?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It's the color of the milk. Americans don't have UHT milk, whatever that is, and all the other varieties that modern Europeans have. All milk here is fresh. All milk is categorized by the fat content. Last I checked you have whole milk (4% fat), low-fat (2% fat), and non-fat (0%). Some companies sell a 1% fat milk.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Americans don't have UHT milk, whatever that is, and all the other varieties that modern Europeans have. All milk here is fresh.
    We do have shelf-stable milk. It comes in tetra-paks (those square boxes like juice boxes). Pay attention next time you're in the grocery store. ;)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The question is if it's the milk itself that's blue-white, or if it's milk coming in a blue-white package? In Sweden we often speak about blue, green or red milk, there's nothing wrong with the colour of the milk, it's the packages that are blue, green or red, depending on if it's skimmed, semi-skimmed or full milk. There seems to be a brand of milk in France named Lait bleu-blanc, could it be this brand the girls like?
    Well done Autumn Owl! Lait bleu-blanc = blue-white milk

    And there, ladies and gentlemen, is the answer. :thumbsup:
     
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