blunted their courage and <stayed their further advance into India>

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
"As for the Macedonians, however, their struggle with Porus blunted their courage and stayed their further advance into India. For having had all they could do to repulse an enemy who mustered only twenty thousand infantry and two thousand horse, they violently opposed Alexander when he insisted on crossing the river Ganges also, the width of which, as they learned, was thirty-two furlongs, its depth a hundred fathoms, while its banks on the further side were covered with multitudes of men-at‑arms and horsemen and elephants"
<Source: "Chandragupta Maurya" in WIKIPEDIA https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandragupta_Maurya>
I'd like to know "stay" can take an object as in my example.
 
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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    It is possible to use "stay" transitively, Park. This sentence comes from WR's sixth definition for "stay" as a verb: He stayed his hand before striking the child.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, owlman5, for your kind answer. :)
    WR say "stay" means "endure", but in my example, "stay" looks like to mean "impede."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome, Park. "Impede" is much better than "endure" in your example. You'll notice that WR suggests "to stop" and "to halt" after "stay" in the sixth definition. I think "stop" or "halt" are the meanings the author had in mind in that sentence.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, owlman5, for your continuing support.:)
    Then, I'd like to check with you if I can take it that the underlined sentence means "their struggle with Porus stopped them from their further advance into India."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Park. I'm sorry for the tardy reply.

    Your version is pretty good. You'll notice that the original sentence used "stayed their further advance into India". If you want to, it is easy to rephrase your version so that it uses the same grammar that the original does: their struggle with Porus stopped/halted their further advance into India.

    Of course this means the same thing, but you really don't need to introduce another object - "them" - when you change the verb.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, owlman5, for your continuing to answer. :)
    No, I know you were in bed when I was making a post.
    Then, I was wondering I can say the follwoing.
    "The heavy rain stopped my going out."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome, Park.

    You can say that, and there's nothing wrong with the grammar. I wouldn't expect to hear that version in a casual remark about going out, however. People usually say something like this: It was raining really hard, so I couldn't go out.

    Not every phrase you find in literature will be suitable for ordinary talk. The construction you asked about in your first thread looks rather literary to me.
     
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