blurred

  • Trinibeens

    Senior Member
    NYC
    U.S. English
    I think you could say that the defects blurred the meaning, but not that the speech itself was blurred.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    It's an interesting way of putting it :D Aside from "unclear," I would probably consider "unintelligible" or "incoherent" (but I just saw "muddled" in the dictionary and I think that's a funny one, too - I wonder if that can be used).
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    The closest equivalent of "blurred" in regard to speech is probably "slurred". OED defines to slur as "to speak indistinctly". Slur can also, of course, mean an insinuation or allegation.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The difficulty I am finding is that words like blurred, slurred, indistinct, unclear, unintelligible, incoherent ... seem to suggest a speech impediment of some kind rather than incorrect pronunciation.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    We all know that an image can be blurred. But can one describe the unclear speech of a child bristling with defects of pronuciation as blurred?

    I am undecided as to whether this is an appropriate turn of speech for a text where one needs to be exceptionally careful and correct.
    Are the "defects of pronunciation" the results of a physical impediment, or of sloppy diction?
     
    The sentence is something like: the unclear ,-----, speech of a child whose vocabulary is sufficient for his age, who manages to correctly construct sentences and observes the harmony of words, may be associated either with some injuries or diseases of his speech organs or with gradual deterioration of his hearing abilities.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    If you are translating, or need a second adjective for some reason, GEmatt's suggestion,
    indistinct, is a good one. Blurred, in an objective description such as this, is not insulting or pulitikly inkeerrect.
     

    Trinibeens

    Senior Member
    NYC
    U.S. English
    The sentence is something like: the unclear ,-----, speech of a child whose vocabulary is sufficient for his age, who manages to correctly construct sentences and observes the harmony of words, may be associated either with some injuries or diseases of his speech organs or with gradual deterioration of his hearing abilities.
    I would fill in that blank with "inarticulate". My dictionary has the primary meaning of articulate as "uttered clearly in distinct syllables", so inarticulate would be the antonym.

    Trini
     
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