Boarden Germany

Nice tella

Banned
French
Hello!

I've been saying "I live boarden Germany" all my life and no one ever corrected me. I was writing an email and taping it and it came as a mistake! What a surprise for me, I am sad that no one ever told me it was wrong to say that! So how do you say it. It live in the boarder of Germany? Are they different ways?

Please don't feel bad to correct me!!!

Tella C.
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It live in the boarder of Germany?
    I think you mean to say that you live...


    --on the border with Germany

    or

    --in a border region of Germany

    Note that boarder is a noun that means:

    1. a person, especially a lodger, who is supplied with regular meals. 2. a member of a boarding party.
    3. Somebody who rides a snowboard or a surfboard.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hmm... a boarder is someone who rents a room in a house. A border is where two countries meet. Which are you?
    Do you live as a boarder?
    Or do you live on the border?
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    "Boarden/borden Germany" doesn't make any sense.
    Do you live in Germany or France?

    Here are some suggestions:
    I live on the border of Germany.
    I live in France, on the border of/with Germany.
    I live in the place where France borders [on] Germany.
    I live in France, in an area bordering Germany.
     

    windhair

    Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    "Boarden/borden Germany" doesn't make any sense.
    Do you live in Germany or France?

    Here are some suggestions:
    I live in France, on the border of/with Germany.
    A question rises when I see this answer.

    "on" the border of Germany, this sounds like the place I live belong to German.

    I heard once that when the place is not inside the border of what, it should be “to ” the border of Germany, I'm right?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "on" the border of Germany, this sounds like the place I live belongs to Germany.

    I heard once that when the place is not inside the border of what, it should be “to ” the border of Germany, I'm right?
    No. I live to the border of Germany is not natural English; if it has a meaning at all, it means that if you cross the German border you will die!

    I live on the border of Germany, if interpreted literally, means that you are in both countries at the same time. However, in everyday conversation it really means "close to the border of Germany." It is entirely common and natural to speak of living on the border of a place without meaning that you live across that border:

    Schreckling is a small town in France on the German border.
     

    Nice tella

    Banned
    French
    Well, let's take an example. Strasbourg (France) is very close to Germany. But it's not in Germany, just very close, how would you say that in English.
     
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