boat slip / slips

Lexicographe

Member
France / français
Hello, I'm helping on WR French-English dictionary and there is this entry:

slip
n
pier
The ship glided into the slip.



I have a major problem: I can't identify this word. I checked in several unilingual dictionaries but couldn't find it. :(

In my own paper bilingual dictionary, I found a plural word: slips, but it is an internal part of the ship, where goods are stored. This doesn't fit with the example sentence given here.


Do you know what this slip means as a noun?
 
  • Doppelrahmstufe

    Senior Member
    Austria, German
    An Austria/Germany "splip" is very common among yachtsman.

    In simple words, a "slip" is a sloping level, where you can get your ship in and out of the water.

    If you own a small sailing boat with e.g. less than 500 kg it is not necesarry to water it by a crane. You can drive backwards with your boat on the trailer to water it.

    --
    Please, feel free to correct my grammar and wording.
     

    Lexicographe

    Member
    France / français
    THANK YOU so much Doppelrahmstufe!
    Your crystal clear explanation enabled me to find the proper word. :)
     

    lizzeymac

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi -
    In AE sailing, and I think perhaps also BE?, the setup Doppelrahmstufe is describing is called a "slipway" in a marina or yacht yard, or launch ramp, and "slip" is a narrow berth for a boat, either at a pier or dock, as mentioned by Cuchu.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Lizzymac is correct. It's more muddled than this, however. Slip is frequently used by shipbuilders as a short form of slipway. Slip is also a colloquial term used as a substitute for ramp, and this fits with Doppelrahmstufe's
    example.

    Neither slipway nor ramp fits with the original question:
    n
    pier
    The ship glided into the slip.

    There is no pier associated with a launching ramp/slip/slipway. A ship, on launch, will go down a slip, but will not glide into a slip, unless it is a mooring place.

    Finally, a small boat of the type Doppelrahmstufe described would not be called a ship.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Here is an example of slip, used to mean a berthing place:

    As you are approaching your slip, make an imaginary line from the center of the bow of your boat, on a slow arcing curve (in your case to the right), into the middle of your slip. [...] When approaching your slip you need to have some momentum to overcome any wind or current. However, momentum does not equal speed. You want just enough to get into the slip and be able to shift smoothly into reverse to stop the boat.


    If there is not enough room between rows of slips to do this in one continuos arc, you'll need to use reverse and make a few "course adjustments."
    http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/moredock.htm "Docking tips"
     
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