1. Callmepolyglot Member

    Canary islands
    English - British
    What does bodrio infumable mean? The full context is "Le gustó a él. Nada. Salió cabreado del cine. Le pareció un bodrio infumable". Bodrio means "algo malo, feo, de muy mala calidad" and infumable means "que no se puede entender, soportar, etc". I guess that a derogatory translation is needed. I guess that in American English it would a Jackass an in British English it would be an unbearable arse. Can someone suggest something better?
     
  2. Anna_Barcelona

    Anna_Barcelona Senior Member

    London
    Catalan and Spanish
    Do you actually use "jackass" and "arse" for things? I thought you'd only call people that. I mean, what they're describing there as a "bodrio infumable" is the film.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2010
  3. bondia

    bondia Senior Member

    Illes Balears
    English-England
    Is "le gustó a él" a question? I imagine so.
    "Did he like it?. Not at all. He left the cinema in anger/pissed off (informal y vulgar). He thought it was a load of rubbish/a waste of time/crap" (informal y vulgar)
     
  4. Callmepolyglot Member

    Canary islands
    English - British
    It's true that I thought the person was meant and not the film. I'm hopeless with 3rd person personal pronouns. Jackass and arse can't be used to refer to objects. Can 'bodrio infumable' refer to people as well or only objects?
     
  5. Anna_Barcelona

    Anna_Barcelona Senior Member

    London
    Catalan and Spanish
    No, a "bodrio" can only be a thing - a film, a speech, a TV show, a book...
     
  6. Callmepolyglot Member

    Canary islands
    English - British
    Many thanks.
     
  7. WillieTheSkimo

    WillieTheSkimo Senior Member

    España - Catalunya
    Español - Català
    Hey!!
    I dont know if this comment is going to be be of any help, since it's so posterior to the thread...anyways:
    the adjective "infumable" is, literally, "not smokeable".
    It is a really cool hiperbole...by saying it, you imply that whatever (story, text, speech) / (message you've recieved) is so f***ing bad, or so damned weird, stupid, or incomprehensible - you name it - that you could not even smoke the paper it was written on.
    To explain it in a very graphic, literal way, think of it this way:

    Guy1- Dude! Have you already read " Mi hermana Elba y los altillos del Brumal" ?
    Guy2- Yes, dude!! I had never read something so bad, weird and twisted. Now that was some serious " unsmokable shit" .


    I' ve always thought that it has its origins in the actual smoking of bad quality products...
    ...imagine two stoners sharing some moments and ilegal substances :

    Stoner1- Yo!! Check out this new skunk I grew ...

    - ( Stoner1 Rolls up a joint, gives it to Stoner 2.
    Stoner2 puffs away on it and starts coughing in disgust) -

    Stoner2- Oh, shieeeeet man!! This is some unsmokable shit!!!!! Get it off my face!!!!!!

     
  8. Callmepolyglot Member

    Canary islands
    English - British
    Thanks for the detailed explanation. It sounds like it's only for very colloquial situations.
     
  9. WillieTheSkimo

    WillieTheSkimo Senior Member

    España - Catalunya
    Español - Català
    Hey, Callmepolyglot!!!
    Coloquial? Hmmm....not really.
    My apologies, maybe I exaggerated those situations a little bit too much and mislead you.
    I mean, of course it is used in coloquial registers, but not necessary. It can also be a serious, formal comment or critic on a text...I think it's just the fact that it's really offensive against the "author" of the "bodrio" what makes it sound like it...
    and, besides, in a really colloquial register you'd simply say " Vaya puta mierda de libro! / Vaya putísima mierda de libro! "
    ... depending on who you are talking with, "bodrio" might sound even too much "sophisticated" to them :D .
     

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